Preservation: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Vanessa Smith

School:

Catholic University of America

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

Introduction to the preservation of library and archival collection, including the nature of book and paper materials and how they deteriorate, options for dealing with deteriorated and vulnerable items, and management approaches to preservation, including disaster preparedness, preventive maintenance, and options for reformatting.

Required Textbook:

Banks, Paul N and Roberta Pilette, eds. 2000. Preservation: Issues and Planning.

Link to Syllabus:

http://lis.cua.edu/res/docs/syllabi/2012spring/CLSC647SmithSpring2012.pdf

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Electronic Records Management: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Jane Zhang

School:

Catholic University of America

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

This course introduces students to the principles and methods of managing records as operational, legal, and historical evidence in electronic environments. Topics include definitions of records and records management, organizational and individual recordkeeping behaviors, recordkeeping requirements and systems, electronic records classification and retention, electronic records management applications, strategies and tools for managing structured, unstructured, and Web-based information as records, and archival management of electronic records.

Required Textbook:

Stephens, David O. 2007. Records Management: Making the Transition from Paper to Electronic Records.
National Archives of Australia. 2001. Designing and Implementing Recordkeeping Systems (DIRKS) Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://lis.cua.edu/res/docs/syllabi/2012spring/LSC877ZhangSpring2012.pdf

Marketing Library and Information Services: Spring 2012

Instructor:

David Shumaker

School:

Catholic University of America

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

This course offers an introduction to modern marketing concepts and their application in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. It addresses the environment in which all types of libraries and information services operate, and provides the student with an opportunity to apply marketing concepts to an information services operation of the student’s choosing. It explores the question, “how can a library or information service determine the needs and wants of its target patrons, and go about satisfying them in such a way as to become (or remain) an information provider of choice?”

Required Textbook:

Kotler, Philip & Nancy Lee. 2007. Marketing in the Public Sector.

Link to Syllabus:

http://lis.cua.edu/res/docs/syllabi/2012spring/LSC876ShumakerSpring2012.pdf

User Interface Design and Evaluation: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Bill Kules

School:

Catholic University of America

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

This course explains how to use design and evaluation techniques to develop successful user interfaces for information systems and other interactive technologies. Students will develop an understanding of the cognitive principles and social issues that affect human-computer interaction. Topics covered include: understanding users and interaction, design strategies, iterative prototyping, formative and summative evaluation, and usability testing. Through a team project, students will apply and refine their knowledge. They will prototype and evaluate the design of a user interface for a real-world system.

Required Textbook:

Rogers, Sharp, and Preece. 2011. Interaction Design: Beyond Human – Computer Interaction, 3rd ed

Link to Syllabus:

http://lis.cua.edu/res/docs/syllabi/2012spring/LSC875KulesSpring2012.pdf

Library Automation and Project Management

Instructor:

Howard Barrie

School:

Catholic University of America

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

This course provides students with strategies for identifying, planning, providing, and evaluating library and information services in public, academic and special libraries. Tools and techniques covered in the course will prepare students to design and/or create accessible and usable information resources from beginning to end of a project lifecycle. This course builds on the foundations of the core courses and emphasizes identity and management skills of information professionals.

Required Textbook:

Cook, Curtis. 2005. Just Enough Project Management: The Indispensable Four-step Process for Managing Any Project Better, Faster, Cheaper.

Link to Syllabus:

http://lis.cua.edu/res/docs/syllabi/2012spring/LSC757HowardSpring2012.pdf

Media Integration in the Curriculum: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Sung Un Kim

School:

Catholic University of America

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

Students will explore the expanding role of non-print and electronic media in libraries and information/media centers. Emphasis will be on evaluation, selection, use, and assessment of non-print, software, equipment, and Internet based tools for media programs in libraries and information/media centers. Class members will explore ways technology can be integrated with content to create an effective learning environment; to support instructional strategies; to support collaborative efforts; and to address instructional differentiation, cultural, and learning diversity

Required Textbook:

Howland, J., Jonassen, D., & Marra, R. 2011. Meaningful Learning with Technology, 4th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://lis.cua.edu/res/docs/syllabi/2012spring/LSC731KimSpring2012.pdf

History and Theory of Cultural Heritage Institutions: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Sally Stokes

School:

Catholic University of America

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

This course provides the 21st-century SLIS-CHIM student with an overview of the history and theory of institutions whose mission is to collect, preserve, organize, interpret, and disseminate information about the cultural heritage, tangible and intangible, and by direct or virtual means. Students will gain a grasp of the purpose and mission of these institutions, from the “cabinet of curiosities” to the virtual collections that cross boundaries among libraries, museums, and
archives, as well as cultural organizations that protect and interpret buildings and sites of cultural and historical significance or are dedicated to grass-roots efforts to promote the protection of heritage. The course will cover ethics, collection and curatorial practices, and the visitor/user experience, as well as the meaning of cultural heritage in the global environment.

Required Textbook:

Cameron, Fiona, and Sarah Kenderdine, eds. 2010. Theorizing Digital Cultural Heritage.
Alexander, Edward P., and Mary Alexander. 2007. Museums in Motion: An Introduction to the History and Functions of Museums. 2nd ed.
Karp, Ivan, ed. 2006. Museum Frictions: Public Cultures/Global Transformations.
Kurin, Richard. 1997. Reflections of a Culture Broker.

Link to Syllabus:

http://lis.cua.edu/res/docs/syllabi/2012spring/LSC677StokesSpring2012.pdf