Information Technologies for Libraries and Information Agencies

Instructor:

School:

Rutgers

Semester:

Description:

This course gives students with a hands-on introduction to software tools and technology used in the provision of information services. Students will learn key concepts in Web technologies (e.g., XHTML, CSS), Web programming (e.g., JavaScript, PHP) and data management (e.g., XML, MySQL). Students will learn how to use and evaluate Web services, social software and open source software tools. Students will learn how information technology is used in today’s libraries, e.g., integrated library systems, technical services, document management, and provision of Web services. The knowledge and skills conveyed in this course will assist students in applying information, web and data technologies in various information services and in further related MLIS courses.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/images/syllabus_550.pdf

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Materials for Young Adults

Instructor:

School:

Rutgers

Semester:

Description:

What is a “young adult”? What, then, is “young adult literature”? We will debate and discuss both questions, but there is one term that is sure to be mentioned often for both meanings of “young adult”: “change.” If nothing else, young adulthood is a time in which a person develops in new ways, and young adult literature itself has gone through great rising and falling waves. This class will take a unique approach to that theme of change by looking at YA literature through the eyes of the distinct and at times misaligned constituencies who judge it: publishers; reviewers; librarians; teachers; parents; and young adults themselves. In so doing we will acquaint ourselves with both classic and new young adult books, and thus students who are training to use books with teenagers will have a solid grounding in this ever-shape-shifting field. YALSA, the ALA division most relevant for this class, treats Young Adult books as written for readers ages 12-18, and that will be our guide.

Required Textbook:

Sutton, P. 2010. A Family of Readers..
Aronson. 2001. Exploding the Myth.

Link to Syllabus:

http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/images/syllabus_548.pdf

Materials for Children

Instructor:

School:

Rutgers

Semester:

Description:

Examination and evaluation of both print and nonprint materials for children, birth to age twelve. Emphasis on literary and artistic interpretations of picture books and other visual media, including the World Wide Web; the integration of a range of materials into the educational process and the lives of children; and multicultural resources for our global society.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/images/syllabus_547.pdf

Government Information Resources

Instructor:

School:

Rutgers

Semester:

Description:

An introduction to the nature and use of federal, local and international governments’ information resources; problems relating to the acquisition, bibliographic organization and reference use of public documents. Major emphasis on information resources of the U.S. Federal Government.

Required Textbook:

Hernon, Peter et al. 2002. United States Government Information: Policies and Sources.
Sources.

Link to Syllabus:

http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/images/syllabus_541.pdf

Information Literacy, Learning, and Teaching

Instructor:

School:

Rutgers

Semester:

Description:

Development of effective instruction in the use of information resources and technologies in all types of library settings. Special attention is paid to adult learning theory and to the integration of information seeking behavior with instructional design. Students practice instruction in cooperation with librarians and library users in various settings.

Required Textbook:

Grassian, E. S., Kaplowitz, J. R. 2009. Information Literacy Instruction: Theory and Practice, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/images/syllabus_519.pdf

Planning Outreach Service

Instructor:

School:

Rutgers

Semester:

Description:

Barriers of language, culture, disability, or other conditions can hamper access to appropriate library/information services. As the population becomes increasingly varied in its linguistic, ethnic, and cultural characteristics, librarians need to review and adapt services. In this course, students choose a client group, study it, design a service, and write a grant proposal for implementing the service, with a specific institutional setting in mind (academic, public, school, hospital, prison, etc.).

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/images/syllabus_517.pdf