Introduction To Geographic Information Systems: Fall 2013

Instructor:

David Arctur

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

Basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS): how they are designed, created and used. Each 3-hour class will have an hour of lecture and 2 hours of computer lab, during which students will work through a set of lab exercises and their own chosen term project. Invited expert lecturers will describe novel applications of GIS in the geosciences. We will also introduce issues, standards, and technologies for distributing and exchanging GIS data across computing platforms and user communities.

Required Textbook:

Gorr, W. L., Kurland, K. S. 2011. GIS Tutorial 1: Basic Workbook for ArcGIS 10.1.
Bolstad, P. 2012. GIS Fundamentals: A First Text on Geographic Information Systems.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/Arctur_David/2013/fall/385T/index.php

Treatment Techniques for Bound Materials: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Rebecca Elder

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

This class will cover the basic principles of book repair and book repair program management for non-rare materials.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/Elder_Rebecca/2014/Spring/Syllabus%20Book%20Repair%20Spring%202014.pdf

Treatment Techniques for Flat Paper: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Karen Pavelka

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Techniques that can do a substantial amount of good for the collection, but can be performed with minimal equipment, space, materials and skill will be covered. Additionally, students will learn how to teach techniques to others and how to evaluate and improve technicians’ performance

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/pavelka/2014/Spring/393C.10/INF393C.10%20Spring%202014.pdf

Digital Archiving and Preservation: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Patricia Galloway

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The course will focus upon what happens to electronic records from all sources, including preservation reformatting and digital library creation, once they have crossed the “archival threshold” (whether actually or figuratively) for permanent retention. The course will cover media refreshment, conversion to neutral formats vs. emulation to retain original format, migration, migration on demand; significant properties of digital objects, what they are and their importance for preservation; format and metadata repositories and the use of metadata in digital archives; digital signatures, message digests, authenticity, and reauthentication in the long-term preservation of electronic records; and electronic records archival repository construction, use, and administration. Projects based on the iSchool institutional repository and the UTDR will be undertaken by students as case studies. Students will also be introduced to how existing standard practices in the information technology field are being adapted to archival requirements: code versioning, vaulting, and escrow, data warehousing, text and data mining, web crawling, knowledge management, IT auditing. Issues of access, including privacy and open records in the context of World Wide Web standards and digital library initiatives, will also be addressed.

Required Textbook:

Jones, R., Andrew, T., MacColl, J. 2006. The Institutional Repository.
Farmer, D., Venema, W. 2005. Forensic Discovery. (online)
Harvey, R. 2010. Digital Curation: A How-to-do-it Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/galloway/2014/spring/INF392K/index.html

Introduction to Archival Enterprise II: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Ciaran Trace

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Administrative and professional issues, including organizing the work of a repository, management issues, marketing, space, law, and ethics.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/Trace_Ciaran/2014/Spring/INF389S/index.php

Appraisal and Selection of Records: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Patricia Galloway

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The Appraisal and Selection course will treat paper records and those in other media, including electronic records. I plan to focus critically upon the following themes: what is the traditional theoretical basis for appraisal of archival materials, both records and manuscripts, and the social setting for its emergence; what were the effects of the shift to a “documentation strategy” as social history gained importance after the 1960s in the US and elsewhere; what differences are there in appraising personal as opposed to organizational records; what are the changes implied and entailed by electronic records in both organizational and personal arenas; and what have been the impacts of changes in archival practice on the structure of the archival record. Students will participate in class appraisal exercises and investigate appraisal practices in existing archives to discover what kinds of appraisal decisions are made in real-world environments, what constraints lead to such decisions, and how (and when and if!) archivists document their appraisal decisions.

Required Textbook:

Burton, A. 2005. Archive Stories: Facts, Fictions and the Writing of History.
Cook, T. 2011. Controlling the Past: Documenting Society and Institutions.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/galloway/2014/spring/INF389J/index.html

School Library Management: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Barbara Immroth

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Philosophy, objectives, and management of the learning resources center, in terms of facilities, staff resources, administrative procedures, services and programs.

Required Textbook:

Krashen, S. 2004. The Power of Reading: Insights from the Research, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/immroth/2014/Spring/INF388C/

Digital Media Collections: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Melanie Feinberg

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Conceptually, this iteration of 385U is an inquiry into the unknown. Together, as a community of scholar-designers, we will investigate how the notion of residuality, or the experience of being insufficiently described via a classification system, can be actively enacted as part of an information collection’s descriptive infrastructure (metadata). Our exploration focuses on three questions:

  • How can a digital collection foreground the experience of the residual?
  • What constitutes the authoring experience of such a digital collection?
  • What constitutes the reading experience of such a digital collection?

Structurally, this course combines seminar-style, focused discussions of readings with project-based elements of a design studio. We will use activities of critically interrogating experimental designs, making our own designs, and reflecting back on our process and product to generate insight into our foundational questions. Our design practice will be grounded in the idea that a collection is both a form of expression and a form of experience, shaped by the designer, or author, but brought into being by user (or audience, or reader) interactions with the collection’s resources.

Practically, the ideas we engage and the skills we will learn should be applicable to any sort of collection. However, our design environment for this course will focus on digital media collections (specifically videos) made available online as a type of digital library.

Required Textbook:

Anzaldúa, G. 2012. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza, 4th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/feinberg/2014/spring/INF385U/index.html

Older Adult Information Needs & Behaviors: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Bo Xie

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This course examines the aging of the population and its implications for society and the individual, and the social and individual changes related to older age, from the perspective of the information world of older adults. Representative topics may include: types and amount of information older adults want and sources where they obtain the information; information services for older adults; challenges and opportunities for information organizations (e.g., public libraries, hospitals) to provide age-appropriate information services to the aging population; the role of information technology in the information world of older adults; the role of information organizations such as public libraries in promoting computer literacy among the older population; the public library as a key site for information, lifelong learning, and empowerment; family relationships in later life; older adults’ spiritual needs; and older adults as diverse individuals with differing information needs, behaviors, and sources.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

https://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/Xie_Bo/2014/Spring/INF_385T/INF385T.syllabus.1.13.2014.pdf

Human Computation & Crowdsourcing: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Matthew Lease

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This graduate seminar will read survey recently published research in Human Computation and Crowdsourcing. Note that crowdsourcing has a wide range of meanings beyond what will be covered in the course; we will focus on human computational aspects.

The rise of today’s digitally-connected, diverse, distributed online population is creating a new way of organizing/performing digital work, as well as building information systems. Crowdsourcing describes outsourcing tasks to large numbers of people in order to leverage the wisdom of crowds. Crowdsourcing platforms such as Amazon Mechanical Turk have gained particular attention as active online marketplaces for connecting with the largely under-utilized global workforce. Crowdsourcing offers intriguing new opportunities for accomplishing different kinds of tasks or achieving broader participation than previously possible, as well as completing standard tasks more accurately in less time and at lower cost, while simultaneously providing new opportunities to workers (e.g. to have fun, to to find employment in economically-depressed or politically-unstable geographical areas, etc.). See SamaSource, created by a former PeaceCorps member after visiting political refugee camps.

Crowdsourcing represents a new intersection of people and technology with corresponding new challenges and opportunities. Since crowdsourcing is ultimately about working with people, it incorporates issues of developing effective design for human factors and human-computer interaction (HCI), as well as issues of economics and ethics. With regard to computing, crowdsourcing creates fascinating new opportunities for leveraging real-time human computation for a range of diverse tasks: data annotation, data processing, system evaluation, and “closing the loop” in developing hybrid human-machine systems.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/18bFi1zpN9xP44amIJMve_Ua9UErCo3UpexT286fOy-0/edit?usp=sharing