Information Architecture: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Andromeda Yelton

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Howdy and welcome! While this course is formally “Information Architecture”, I think of it as “Help! My organization has a web site (and I might end up in charge of it)”.

In one semester, I can’t hope to make you experts in all the things you might need to know to build and manage a web site — especially since it’s always changing! However, you will know what domains you’ll need to learn more about if you find yourself running a real-world web site; the vocabulary for talking with domain experts; and where to go to learn more.

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

https://thatandromeda.github.io/courseware/LIS_861_Spring_2014/
Fork it on Github

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Information Architecture: Spring 2013

Instructor:

Jonathan Senchyne

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

This is a graduate course studying the relationship between form and content in the structure and transmission of information. We Will approach information architecture not only as a set of practices for web development and implementation, but also as a prompt to think about how and why information is structured as it is in print, digital, and other formats – at under different historical, social,and cultural conditions that shape information, its representation, and its users.Therefore, we will explore practical issues in web design such as coding, usability,navigation, and evaluation always with an eye toward situating these within the larger (and sometimes theoretical or historical) contexts of paratextuality, genre, accessibility, print/digital culture, and media history. The goal of our explorations of form and content in theory and practice is both basic skills in information architecture for and sophisticated graduate-level understanding of past, present, and future issues pertaining to information representation.

Required Textbook:

Petroski, H. 2000. The Book on the Bookshelf.
Mak, B. 2012. How the Page Matters.
Krug, S. 2005. Don’t Make Me Think, 2nd ed.
Jenkins, H., Ford, S., Greene, J. 2013. Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture.

Link to Syllabus:

https://www.academia.edu/4421718/LIS_861_Information_Architecture_Syllabus

XML, Document Structures, and Metadata: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Dorothea Salo

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Description:

  • Hand-authored well-formed and valid XML documents.
  • Parse/validate and correct non-well formed and invalid XML.
  • Analyze unfamiliar documents to decompose them into XML’s hierarchical and pointer structures.
  • Build a base document that is valid per an unfamiliar DTD or XML Schema, based on existing documentation and sample documents.
  • Declare XML namespaces and use namespace prefixes correctly.
  • Recognize and read a few XML languages common in libraries and archives (e.g. EAD, MODS, TEI).
  • Author a well-formed and valid multiple-namespace XML document by hand.
  • Write a basic XSLT transformation from XML to XHTML.
  • Read a relatively simple RDF graph.
  • Read and hand-author acceptable RDF triples in N-triple, Turtle, and RDF/XML formats.
  • Insert RDFa data correctly into an HTML document.
  • Recognize and use syntax for common RDF datatypes and notations (e.g. URIs, strings, dates, language)
  • Recognize and read a few RDF languages common in libraries and archives (e.g. DC, SKOS).

Required Textbook:

Harold, E. R., Means, W. S. 2004. XML in a Nutshell.

Link to Syllabus:

http://files.dsalo.info/652syll2014.pdf

Digital Curation: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Dorothea Salo

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

  • Assess, plan for, manage, and execute a small-scale data-management or digital-archiving project.
  • Assess digital data for preservability; make yes-or-no accessioning decisions.
  • Understand (and where relevant, apply) technological, economic, and social models of digital preservation and sustainability.
  • Understand forms, formats, and lifecycles of digital data across a wide breadth of contexts.
  • Evaluate software and hardware tools relevant across the data lifecycle.
  • Construct a current-awareness strategy; assimilate substantial amounts of relevant writing.
  • Self-sufficiently acquire technical knowledge.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://files.dsalo.info/668syll2014.pdf

Publishing, Knowledge Institutions and Society: E-Revolutions?

Instructor:

Dorothea Salo

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Description:

  • Sufficient knowledge of US copyright law to advise digitization projects, uncertain authors and instructors, and digital archivists on common, relatively simple fair-use, orphan-works, reuse, and (re)publishing dilemmas
  • Sufficient knowledge of current trends, processes, and standards in trade and scholarly publishing to advise would-be authors, advocate for balanced laws and policies, and navigate professional publishing opportunities
  • Sufficient knowledge of intellectual-property-related dilemmas, movements, and legislation (past and pending) to be a thoughtful information advocate and information-agency leader
  • Sufficient knowledge of publishing trends to inform collection-development decisions in academic, public, K-12, and special-library settings
  • The ability to assess a rapidly-evolving situation, explain it clearly and succinctly to others, and devise feasible responses to it
  • The ability to devise a well-reasoned long-range scenario and a strategy to respond to it
  • The ability to write a journal-quality book review

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://files.dsalo.info/640syll2014.pdf

Digital Trends, Tools, and Debates: Summer 2014

Instructor:

Dorothea Salo

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Summer 2014

Description:

  • Broad awareness of digital technologies in use in libraries, archives, and other information agencies.
  • Vocabulary and knowledge of conventions needed to communicate with technical staff.
  • Ability to evaluate, plan and hire for, select, safely and securely work with digital technologies.
  • Awareness of the social and legal forces that impact digital technologies; controversies surrounding them; and the complex relationship between digital technologies and the future of information agencies.
  • Ability to contribute appreciably to a team working on a defined project; awareness of project-management tools and techniques.
  • Sufficient courage, self-awareness, and skill for self-sufficiency in acquiring technical knowledge.
  • Development of ethical and principled approaches to technology adoption and education.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://files.dsalo.info/644syllsum2014.pdf