Introduction to Reference and Information Services: Fall 2010

Instructor:

Lori Bell

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Fall 2010

Description:

Introduces the philosophy, principles, and practice of reference/information services in libraries, information centers, and online communities. Examines the nature of reference work, human information needs, and information literacy. Studies the characteristics and application of bibliographic control, reference effectiveness research, and electronic information retrieval systems. Provides practical experience in evaluation and use of bibliographic and Webographic materials, reference interviewing and search techniques. Includes virtual world field component.

Required Textbook:

Cassell, K. A., Hiremath, U. 2009. Reference and Information Services in the 21st Century: An Introduction, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/601_bell_f10.pdf

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Special Libraries: Spring 2010

Instructor:

Mike Koenig

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2010

Description:

A study of the characteristics, contexts, and roles of special libraries, and of information work in organizations, both profit and not-for-profit. Topics covered include the organization, the administration, the services and functions provided by, and the financial management of special libraries. Particular attention is given to the relationship between the special library and the organization within which it is embedded.

The relationship between Knowledge Management and Special Librarianship is also examined. The emphasis upon Knowledge Management is substantial because libraries in the corporate sector, the largest chunk of the spectrum of special libraries, are increasingly a component of and are subsumed under Knowledge Management, and to be successful, ―librarians‖ must think of themselves primarily as key players in the organization’s KM effort.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/lis_747_syllabus.pdf

Human-Computer Interaction: Spring 2010

Instructor:

Qiping Zhang

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2010

Description:

The course provides an overview of foundations, interaction design and evaluation techniques in HCI, a discipline concerned with understanding user needs, designing and evaluating an interactive system from a user-centered perspective. It covers the psychological and social aspects of users, the impact of user characteristics on design decisions, the user requirements, design approaches, usability evaluation methods, interface paradigms and architectures for user interface implementation. Focusing on library systems and services as examples for evaluation, students acquire practical skills in collecting patron/user needs, prototype design, and evaluating website/system. The course project will expose students to key skills (including usability testing, persona design, card sorting, heuristic evaluation, cognitive walkthrough, and more) necessary to understand and work in the exciting field of HCI.

Required Textbook:

Sharp H., Rogers, Y. & Preece, J. 2007. Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/lis_707_spring_2010.pdf

Library Public Relations: Spring 2010

Instructor:

Pauline Rothstein

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2010

Description:

This course addresses public relations practices as they apply to public, academic and special libraries. These practices are also relevant in research organizations outside of libraries.

Required Textbook:

Down, N. 2010. Bite-Sized Marketing.
Barber, P., Wallace, L. 2010. Building a Buzz.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/lis_662_syllabus.pdf

Film and Media Collections: Summer 2010

Instructor:

Nancy E. Friedland

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Summer 2010

Description:

The course will provide an introduction to building and maintaining collections and services related to visual media, primarily moving image, sound and ephemera. Discussions will survey key components such as the history of film and media in library collections, collection development, access, equipment, copyright, emerging technologies and management of non-print formats.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Syllabus-Film-2010-Summer.pdf

Humanities Sources and Services: Summer 2010

Instructor:

Nancy E. Friedland

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Summer 2010

Description:

The Humanities as a field of study consists of literature, language, fine arts, architecture, music, performing arts, film, religion and philosophy. This course is intended to be an introduction to the kinds of materials, print, electronic and other non-print, in the humanities that are likely to be used in libraries. Throughout the course, students are given the opportunity to examine print and electronic humanities reference sources. This course also provides insight into the practices, procedures, and problems of humanities libraries.

Required Textbook:

Hock, R. 2010. The Extreme Searcher’s Internet Handbook: a guide for the serious searcher, 3rd ed.
searcher. 3rd ed.
Mann, T. 2005. The Oxford Guide to Library Research.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/LIS-901-Humanities-S10-Friedland.pdf

Digital Libraries and Archives: Fall 2010

Instructor:

Paul Conway

School:

University of Michigan

Semester:

Fall 2010

Description:

This course focuses on the current state of “digital libraries” from a multidisciplinary perspective. Its point of departure is the possibilities and prospects for convergence of professions and cultures around the notion of digital media and content. The course covers the history of the idea of the digital library and the digital archive, especially its manifestation as projects and programs in academic, nonprofit, and research settings, and the suite of policy issues that influence the development and growth of digital libraries and archives. A foundation of core archival principles as applied in digital library and archives settings serves as an intellectual construct supporting the exploration of the related concepts of scholarly communication, digital preservation, cyberinfrastructure, representation, and standards/best practices. Students are expected to master a diverse literature, to participate actively in the discussion of issues, and to take steps, collectively and individually, to advance our understanding of future directions of digital libraries and archives.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://open.umich.edu/education/si/si640/fall2010