Literature and Materials for Young Adults: Spring 2011

Instructor:

Myra A. Paul

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2011

Description:

This course is a survey of literature and digital resources for older children and adolescents. We will review criteria for evaluating and using such materials as they relate to the needs, interests, reading and other capabilities of today’s adolescent

Required Textbook:

Nilsen, A. P., Donelson, K. L. 2009. Literature for Today’s Young Adults, 8th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20646%20Spring%202011%20Myra%20Paul.pdf

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Selection and Evaluation of Resources for Learning: Spring 2011

Instructor:

Sheri Anita Massey

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2011

Description:

Evaluating and selecting resources for learning are complex processes that can be approached from a number of perspectives–building and maintaining an adequate collection, using limited budgetary resources wisely, and balancing the needs and requests of various client constituencies. The most important perspective–and one that can be neglected–is the instructional one: evaluating and selecting resources according to their inherent appropriateness as tools for enhancing learning and their applicability to specific instructional settings and learners’ needs in the K-12 environment.

Library media specialists (LMSs) are typically viewed by the other members of the instructional team as the experts in selecting materials and can exert enormous influence in determining which resources make their way into the classroom as well as into the library media center. In order to recommend and select materials that will truly enhance students’ learning, LMSs must have comprehensive knowledge of components and sources of effective resources for learning. In this course, a number of topics are covered to help students gain that knowledge: the nature and uses of resources for contemporary learning environments; procedures for locating and evaluating such resources; systematic planning for the use of learning resources; advantages and disadvantages of various media formats; and processes for creating collections that support the curriculum.

The course content is based upon theory and best practice; however, assignments and projects are designed to be practical and useful to students as they begin careers as library media specialists. It is recommended that all assignments be completed to respond to needs within a specific school and/or district environment

Required Textbook:

Bishop, K. 2007. The Collection Program in Schools; Concepts, Practices, and Information Sources, 4th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC641%20Spring%202011%20Sherri%20Massey.pdf

Library Media Specialists as Information Professionals: Fall 2011

Instructor:

Mega M. Subramaniam

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2011

Description:

Over the past 100 years, education in the United States has grown in size and–even more–in complexity. Part of this development has involved the developing recognition of the importance of the library media program as an integral part of the educational system. In order to function effectively within that system, school library media specialists (LMSs) must understand a number of elements that affect their position in the school: the historical, organizational, and contemporary contexts of library media programs; the principles of teaching, learning, and information literacy that underlie the library media program; and the leadership role that LMSs can play within the school community. This course introduces students to all these elements, concentrating on the various roles of the LMS in supporting student learning.

The roles are derived from the mission statement first adopted in 1988 by the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) and the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) to guide the development and improvement of library media programs nationwide. This mission statement was reaffirmed in 1998, and expanded in the revised guidelines for the field, Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs, published by the American Library Association in 2009. As stated below, the mission statement underlies the College’s School Library Media Specialization and LBSC 640, which is designed to introduce students to the specialization and to the information professions in general:

The mission of the school library media program is to ensure that students and staff are effective users of ideas and information. The school library media specialist (LMS) empowers students to be critical thinkers, enthusiastic readers, skillful researchers, and ethical users of information by:

  • collaborating with educators and students to design and teach engaging learning experiences that meet individual needs.
  • instructing students and assisting educators in using, evaluating, and producing information and ideas through active use of a broad range of appropriate tools, resources,
    and information technologies.
  • providing access to materials in all formats, including up-to-date, high-quality, varied literature to develop and strengthen a love of reading.
  • providing students and staff with instruction and resources that reflect current information needs and anticipate changes in technology and education.
  • providing leadership in the total education program and advocating for strong school library media programs as essential to meeting local, state, and national education goals.

The course also will introduce students to the Standards for the 21st Century Learner, launched by AASL in October 2007. This document outlines the skills that students need for understanding, thinking and mastering subjects; the dispositions that guide their thinking and intellectual behaviors; the responsibilities that reflect behaviors used by independent learners in researching, investigating and problem solving; and the self-assessment strategies that enable students to reflect on their own learning.

Required Textbook:

American Association of School Librarians. 2009. Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs.

Donham, J. 2008. Enhancing Teaching and Learning: a Leadership Guide for School Library Media Specialists, 2nd edition revised.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20640%20Spring%202011%20Mega%20Subramanium.pdf

Research Methods in Library and Information Science: Spring 2011

Instructor:

Peter Liebscher

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2011

Description:

This course covers the techniques and strategies of research as applied to the definition, investigation, and evaluation of information problems. It explores the nature, role and methods of scholarly research and provides a basic introduction to scientific inquiry, hypothesis formulation, and some statistical testing. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods of research design methods are considered from the aspects
of implementation, analysis, and interpretation.

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20701-INFM%20718%20M%20Spring%202011%20Peter%20Liebscher.pdf

Archives and Manuscripts: Fall 2011

Instructor:

Philip B. Eppard

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Fall 2011

Description:

Administration of archival and manuscript collections; appraisal, arrangement, description, and reference services; current practices at national, state, and local levels. Topics include concepts of records management, preservation and conservation, online retrieval systems, and freedom of access and privacy.

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/cci-old/images/ist656_Fall_2011.pdf

Collection Development and Management: Fall 2011

Instructor:

Donghee Sinn

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Fall 2011

Description:

This course is a survey of theoretical and practical aspects of the selection, acquisition, evaluation, and management of resources to meet the information needs of clientele in libraries and other institutional environments. The course covers a variety of related issues, including analysis of information needs, criteria for selection, publishing trends, electronic access, resource sharing, outsourcing, collection use evaluation, and useful resources for collection development.

Required Textbook:

Evans, G. E. 2005. Developing Library and Information Center Collections.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/cci/images/IIST606_Fall_2011.pdf

Literature for Young Adults: Fall 2011

Instructor:

Joyce R. Laiosa

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Fall 2011

Description:

An introductory survey of literature for young adults (ages 13-18), with an emphasis on authors from the latter half of the twentieth-century. Includes a discussion of the characteristics, needs, and reading interests of teenagers, a critical study of the literature, an overview of basic selection tools and practice in booktalking, as well as an introduction to the basic skills in accessing electronic resources on young adult literature.

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/cci/images/IIST578_FALL_2011.pdf