Children’s Literature and Materials: Fall 2013

Instructor:

Edith Ching

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

This course surveys literature and other materials for children and youth as they relate to the needs, interests, reading abilities and other capabilities of readers through middle school (grade 8). Criteria for evaluating and using such materials will also be discussed.

A driving question that we will continually revisit throughout this course is: Is children’s literature defined by the act of children reading it or are there specific characteristics that make this a unique literature?

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20645.doc

Advertisements

Archival Principles, Practices, and Programs: Fall 2013

Instructor:

Katie Shilton

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

This course is intended to provide an introduction to all aspects of archival work, including records management, selection, appraisal, arrangement, description, preservation, reference, outreach, and special media including electronic records. The course also provides an overview of the elements of an archival program, the role and work of archivists, contemporary issues and conditions, and professional needs.

Required Textbook:

Pugh, M. J. 2005. Providing Reference Services for Archives and Manuscripts, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20605%20Fall%202013%20Syllabus.pdf

Systems Analysis and Design: Spring 2013

Instructor:

Ping Wang

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

Contemporary information systems are extremely complex and varied. Consequently, developing effective and robust information systems call for a systematic analysis and planning effort on the part of system development teams. Systems analysis and design process spans the entirety of the information system lifecycle, which starts with the conception of the need for a specific information system and ends with the total replacement of the system with a next generation one. This course will introduce the systems analysis and design process in its entirety, and focus on each major step within the process. System analysis and design is still both an art and a science. The course will cover both the science and the art components by introducing essential tools that are used for systems analysis and design, and by offering perspectives that the students can transfer to team projects within the scope of the master’s programs and to real life projects they will venture as information professionals after graduation.

Required Textbook:

Miller, Steven J. 2011. Metadata for Digital Collections: A How-To-Do-Manual.

Hoffer, J.A., George, J.F., and Valacich, J.S. 2011. Modern Systems Analysis and Design, 6th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INFM613-LBSC603-Spring2013-Wang_0.pdf

The Engaged Intellectual: An Introduction to Research and Academic Work: Fall 2013

Instructor:

June Ahn

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

This is a required, 3-credit course for doctoral students in the College of Information Studies. The course is run as an intensive seminar that is intended for first year PhD students.

In this seminar, students will explore a series of issues that confront academics who work in research universities. The course is an “Introduction to Research”, but the process of research is more than a recipe of rote analytical procedures. Instead, research is intimately linked to one’s beliefs about knowledge, scholarly community, and the impact one wants to make on the world.

In this course, students will examine academic life with a particular focus on what it means to undertake research, teaching, and service. By the conclusion of the course, students will have a better understanding of what tenure-track faculty do and how they work in the academy. Students will also explicate how they intend to structure their own professional careers.

Students will read, analyze, and discuss several issues in this semester. First, students will explore and debate what it means to conduct quality research, write for academic audiences, and contribute knowledge in the academy. Second, students will examine the debates around theory, research quality, and constructions of knowledge. Third, students will consider teaching, service, and their roles as academics in the field of Information Studies. The course will ask students to consider and define their identities as individuals, researchers, and teachers. Students will explicate how they see themselves as developing scholars, both at the present time and in their professional future.

Required Textbook:

Crotty, M. 1998. The Foundations of Social Research.
Graff, G., Birkenstein, C. 2009. They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 2nd ed.
O’Meara, K., Terosky, A. L., Neumann, A. 2008. ASHE Higher Education Report, Special Issue: Faculty Careers and Work Lives: A Professional Growth Perspective.
Sword, H. 2012. Stylish Academic Writing.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INST%20800%20-%20Engaged%20Intellectual%202013.pdf

HCI Capstone Prep: Fall 2013

Instructor:

Jen Golbeck

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

The Capstone project is a 6-credit project that demonstrates an HCI student’s ability to form new ideas in the field, conduct research, and present results. Unlike a thesis, the capstone does not have the same level of required research contribution, so students can focus more deeply on issues of theory, design, or methodology. Please review the description of capstone projects in the HCIM Handbook for more details.

This course is the first of two, and is designed to prepare students for the spring capstone course. Students will learn about literature reviews, pilot testing, HCI methodology, human subjects research, and presentation of research. We will review literature in the field and work through a variety of topics so students will have a complete research proposal prepared at the end of the term.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/syllabus.doc

Computational Linguistics I: Fall 2013

Instructor:

Jordan Boyd-Graber

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

Computers have made it possible, even easy, to collect vast amounts of text from a wide variety of sources. It is not always clear, however, how to use those data and how to extract useful information from data. This problem is faced in a tremendous range of scholarly, government, business, medical, and scientific applications. The purpose of this course is to teach some of the best and most general approaches to get the most out of natural language.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

https://docs.google.com/document/u/2/d/1nTkyPlijzNs0ORk7GXbN2ec4X0eoIT5v655gW2RawgM/pub

Follow the Fringe: Documentation and Preservation of Cultural Movements in Media: Summer 2013

Instructor:

Mary Edsall Choquette

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Summer 2013

Description:

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of documentation and preservation of, and access to performance activity information. It specifically focuses on documentation and preservation of movement phenomena performed at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2013, in Edinburgh, Scotland. Working with 8 students, the course will research and follow several performance groups from the California institute of the Arts (CalArts) Theater Program at the Fringe; plan a documentation strategy; implement that strategy; and create metadata for the resulting media and data to ensure future accessibility; and place the media and data in the archives at the University of Maryland and the Institute Archive at CalArts. The course activities also include tours and lectures by archives professionals, festival organizers and include tours of the libraries and archives in the area as well as attending other performances.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INST%20729%20-%20Choquette%20-%20Summer%202013%20.doc