Collaborative Instructional Design and Evaluation: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Mega Subramaniam

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

Over the past several decades, the role of the school librarian has evolved to include a number of new responsibilities. One of the most important of these involves instruction–working individually and in collaboration with teachers to design, develop, and evaluate teaching and learning strategies and materials to meet a variety of instructional needs. Both historically and today, the principles of instructional systems development (ISD) provide an invaluable tool for the school librarian to use in fulfilling this instructional role, and they are introduced and explored in this course. Grounded in the assumption that instruction should be designed by teams or groups to be most effective, ISD is especially useful in supporting the librarians’ work as an “instructional partner” with teachers. A particular focus of the course is the application of ISD to designing information-based learning—that is, creating opportunities for learners to use a full range of information resources for authentic, problem-based learning.

ISD interweaves insights from systems, learning, communications, and management theories into a set of concepts and processes whose application leads to well-planned, reliable instruction. Beginning with the analysis of an instructional problem and moving systematically through a sequence of clearly defined stages, the ISD approach provides a sophisticated set of tools for designers of instruction for both education and training. The process is applicable to the development of instruction in all media formats–the newest varieties of interactive media as well as the more traditional print and audiovisual approaches. Through studying ISD theory and applying its methods to the development of a detailed plan for an instructional product, candidates in this course will master a systematic yet flexible set of principles that can be used in a variety of settings.

Required Textbook:

Wallace, V.L., and Husid, W.N. 2011. Collaborating for Inquiry-based learning: School librarians and teachers partner for student achievement.

American Association of School Librarians. 2009. Standards for the 21st-Century Learner in Action.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/742_syllabus_final_0.pdf

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Seminar in School Library Administration: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Gail C. Bailey

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Development, management, and evaluation of school library programs at all levels.

Required Textbook:

American Association of School Librarians. 2009. Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs.

American Association of School Librarians and Association for Educational Communications and Technology. 1998. Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning.

Donaham, J. 2008. Enhancing Teaching and Learning: a Leadership Guide for School Library Media Specialists, 2nd ed revised.

Harada, V. H., and Yoshina, J. M. 2010. Assessing for Learning: Librarians and Teachers as Partners, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lbsc741slpadministrationbaileyspring2014_0.pdf

Special Collections: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Douglas McElrath

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

This course will explore key issues in managing library-based special collections. From traditional book and paper formats to digital media, special collections in libraries and other cultural institutions are essential source materials that preserve important bodies of information and promote scholarship. Curators of special collections employ a variety of techniques and approaches to identify, acquire, preserve, describe, and make accessible these materials. While the various formats and types of materials in special collections have some unique characteristics, this class will explore commonalities. Finally, special collections curators are facing new challenges due to emerging technologies and changing perceptions about the purpose and value of collections. We will discuss some of these issues and explore how special collections curatorship in the 21st century is evolving.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/syllabus-2014-2_0.pdf

Planning and Evaluating Library Services: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Martha Kyrillidou

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Analysis of quantitative and qualitative methods for planning and evaluating library and information services. Demonstration and use of selecte d methods, including project planning and monitoring methods.

Required Textbook:

Matthews, J. R. 2007. The Evaluation and Measurement of Library Services.

Davidson, E. J. 2012. Actionable Evaluation Basics: Getting succinct answers to the most important questions.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lbsc713spring2014_0.pdf

Achieving Organizational Excellence: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Bruce W. Dearstyne

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

Welcome to LBSC 631, Achieving Organizational Excellence! This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles, practices and techniques of leadership and management as they apply to information-based cultural institutions.

Required Textbook:

Bryan,C. 2007. Managing Facilities for Results.
Burke, J. T. 2013. The Neal-Schuman Library Technology Companion, 4th ed.
Dearstyne, B. W. 2009. Managing Records and Information Programs: Principles, Techniques and Tools.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lbsc_631_syllabus_fall_2014.doc

Information and Universal Usability: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Mega Subramaniam

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This course folows Diverse Popuplations, Inclusion, and Information (LBSC 620) and builds on the concepts of that course. This course focuses on the use and challenges of information services and technologies to provide equal experiences and outcomes to all users. Laws, standards, approaches, component concepts, access needs, and technologies in relation to physical and online information environments.

Required Textbook:

Jaeger, P. T. 2012. Disability and the Internet: Confronting a Digital Divide.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/622_syllabus_2014_final.pdf