Organization of Information Resources: Spring 2008

Instructor:

Michael Crandall

School:

University of Washington

Semester:

Spring 2008

Description:

Introduction to issues in organization of information and information objects including: analysis of intellectual and physical characteristics of information objects, use of metadata and metadata standards for information systems, technological frameworks supporting implementation of metadata standards and taxonomies.

Required Textbook:

Taylor, A. G. 2004. The Organization of Information, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.washington.edu/imt530b/syllabus.doc

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Advanced Cataloging and Classification: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Josephine Sche

School:

Southern Connecticut

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

Cataloging of special library materials; new concepts of descriptive and subject cataloging; role of cataloging in public and technical services; metadata and cataloging of digital collection. Issues of name and subject authority control.

Required Textbook:

Taylor, A. G., Joudrey, D. N. 2009. The Organization of Information, 3rd ed.
Itner, S. S., Lazinger, S. S., Weihs. J., 2006. Metadata and Its Impact on Libraries.
Weber, M. B., Austin, F. A. 2011. Describing Electronic, Digital, and Other Media Using AACR2 and RDA: a how to do it manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.southernct.edu/ils/uploads/textWidget/wysiwyg/documents/ILS_606-S70-Syllabus-Spring_2012-Sche_Josephine.docx

Organizing Information: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Melanie Feinberg

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Introduction to general principles and features of organizing and providing access to information, including varieties and numbers of information-bearing objects, different traditions of practice, user concerns, metadata and metadata formats, document representation and description, subject access, and information system features and evaluation.

This course provides a general introduction to the organization of information, concentrating on the core operations of describing, grouping, arranging, and relating objects. While the course will focus most heavily on the organization of documents, or bibliographic information, the objects most commonly organized in libraries and archives, we will not be unduly concerned with particular implementations for any specific institution. In other words, you will not learn traditional library cataloging or archival description in this class. You will, however, learn the principles that form the basis for all such systems. Accordingly, the assignments for the course emphasize the application of organization principles in desigining mechanisms for organizing information.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/feinberg/2014/spring/INF384C/index.html

Descriptive Bibliography & Rare Book Cataloging: Spring 2014

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The purpose of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of descriptive bibliography and to teach them to prepare detailed descriptions of printed books using these methods as well as library cataloging rules established by Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) (DCRM(B)). Lectures, videos, and rare books in the Grolier Club’s collection will be used to illustrate the physical characteristics of printed books (e.g., paper, typography, illustration processes, and binding); presswork and other production processes (e.g., composition, typesetting, and imposition); and the life of the book after its production, especially provenance evidence from inscriptions, bookplates, and other unique marks. Emphasis will be placed on developing a technical vocabulary to describe the physical aspects of printed books.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create detailed catalog descriptions of printed books and other special collections material according to descriptive bibliographical principles and DCRM(B) standards. Students will also gain a good grounding in the theory and methods of descriptive bibliography, learn how it informs and differs from rare book cataloging, and evaluate current cataloging practices and online retrieval systems on the basis of their treatment of printed books and other special collections material.

Required Textbook:

Baines, P., Haslam, A. 2005. Type & Typography, 2nd ed.
Carter, J. 2004. ABC for Book Collectors, 8th ed.
Library of Congress. 2007. Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books). (online)
Gaskell, P. 1995. A New Introduction to Bibliography.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/901-Rare-Book-Cataloging.pdf