Doctoral Seminar: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

This integrative course is the first of a two-semester sequence of INST 888. Serving as your introduction to the field of Information Studies (aka, Library and Information Studies,
Information Science, the iField, and several other things, depending on who you ask) and research about information, both semesters of the course will present an overview of intellectual
foundations, key areas of research, methods, and theories used in the study of information. While it is impossible to capture the breadth of an entire academic field in the course of two semesters, this course will provide you with a foundation by which you can begin to understand the breadth and depth of this interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary field.

Building on the first semester focus on foundations, users, technologies, and systems related to information and information research, this second semester of INST 888 will focus on two key perspectives by which to examine and conduct research about information. First, it will discuss the different types of contexts that information research can be used to study, from access to ethics and values and from education to public policy. Second, the spring semester will focus research about the institutions that are central to providing information access in society, ranging from the venerable public library to the omnipresent Internet. Most weeks address interrelated comments and institutions, and each week’s readings will introduce research, methods, and theories relevant to the topic. By the end of this semester, students will have a sense of the scope of the field to ensure that they have a solid foundation on which to build their own research as they progress through the doctoral program.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/inst888spring2015.pdf

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The Engaged Intellectual: An Introduction to Research and Academic Work: Fall 2013

Instructor:

June Ahn

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

This is a required, 3-credit course for doctoral students in the College of Information Studies. The course is run as an intensive seminar that is intended for first year PhD students.

In this seminar, students will explore a series of issues that confront academics who work in research universities. The course is an “Introduction to Research”, but the process of research is more than a recipe of rote analytical procedures. Instead, research is intimately linked to one’s beliefs about knowledge, scholarly community, and the impact one wants to make on the world.

In this course, students will examine academic life with a particular focus on what it means to undertake research, teaching, and service. By the conclusion of the course, students will have a better understanding of what tenure-track faculty do and how they work in the academy. Students will also explicate how they intend to structure their own professional careers.

Students will read, analyze, and discuss several issues in this semester. First, students will explore and debate what it means to conduct quality research, write for academic audiences, and contribute knowledge in the academy. Second, students will examine the debates around theory, research quality, and constructions of knowledge. Third, students will consider teaching, service, and their roles as academics in the field of Information Studies. The course will ask students to consider and define their identities as individuals, researchers, and teachers. Students will explicate how they see themselves as developing scholars, both at the present time and in their professional future.

Required Textbook:

Crotty, M. 1998. The Foundations of Social Research.
Graff, G., Birkenstein, C. 2009. They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 2nd ed.
O’Meara, K., Terosky, A. L., Neumann, A. 2008. ASHE Higher Education Report, Special Issue: Faculty Careers and Work Lives: A Professional Growth Perspective.
Sword, H. 2012. Stylish Academic Writing.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INST%20800%20-%20Engaged%20Intellectual%202013.pdf