Managing Information Organizations: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Diane E. Bailey

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

I designed this course to help you develop skills to manage people, projects, and resources in the context of an information organization. The course emphasizes active learning through class exercises in addition to case discussions as well as individual and group assignments. Your coursework should prompt personal reflection: Practice and reflection are central to your learning. Although I gear the course to practical career skills, I ground all the material in theory and research from social psychology, small group research, organizational behavior, strategy, innovation and related fields. We start at the individual level so that you can begin to develop awareness about yourself and your relationships with others that is critical for your success as a manager. We move from there to group level dynamics common in work settings. We end with a higher-level focus on projects, vendors, and budgets.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/Bailey_Diane/2014/Fall/INF387C/SYLLABUS_INF_387C.pdf

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Management of Libraries and Information Services Organizations: Spring 2013

Instructor:

John J. Regazzi

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

Principles and techniques of management applicable to libraries and information service organizations. Focuses management theory on organizing for library and information service, collections, facilities management, and measurement and evaluation of services.

Required Textbook:

Evans, G. E., Ward, P. L., Rugaas, B. 2000. Management Basics for Information Professionals.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/LIS-513-Hybrid-Syllabus-Sp.-2013.pdf

Management of Libraries and Information Centers

Instructor:

School:

Rutgers

Semester:

Description:

An introduction to the current state of management theory, ethics, and practice focusing on leadership and the management of organizational change. Organizational culture is explored as an underpinning for the principal roles and functions of managers, including developing information policy; and managing new information technologies, information and decision support systems, finances, and human resources conducive to the creation of a multicultural workforce for a multicultural society.

Required Textbook:

Moran, B.B., Stueart, R.D. 2012. Library and Information Center Management, 8th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/images/syllabus_570.pdf

Digital Trends, Tools, and Debates: Summer 2014

Instructor:

Dorothea Salo

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Summer 2014

Description:

  • Broad awareness of digital technologies in use in libraries, archives, and other information agencies.
  • Vocabulary and knowledge of conventions needed to communicate with technical staff.
  • Ability to evaluate, plan and hire for, select, safely and securely work with digital technologies.
  • Awareness of the social and legal forces that impact digital technologies; controversies surrounding them; and the complex relationship between digital technologies and the future of information agencies.
  • Ability to contribute appreciably to a team working on a defined project; awareness of project-management tools and techniques.
  • Sufficient courage, self-awareness, and skill for self-sufficiency in acquiring technical knowledge.
  • Development of ethical and principled approaches to technology adoption and education.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://files.dsalo.info/644syllsum2014.pdf

21st Century Leadership: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Ann E. Prentice

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This elective course will be of interest to all students; those who aspire to leadership roles and those who participate in the activities of the organization under the leadership of another. Leadership is present in all cultures and in all eras and while it may be practiced in slightly different ways depending on the cultural environment and time period, its basic principles remain constant. Leadership is a pervasive theme in nearly all aspects of a professional program and is one of the underlying elements of the iSchool programs.

Required Textbook:

Prentice, A. E. 2013. Leadership for the 21st Century.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/inst_660_21st_century_leadership_syllabus.pdf

Information Audits and Environmental Scans: Spring 2009

Instructor:

T. Kanti Srikantaiah

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

An information audit is the process of reviewing the information environment of an organization to identify the information needs of individuals within an organization as well as those of the organization itself. It identifies information created within the organization and assesses its value. It reviews the use of
internal and external information resources. It maps information flows and develops knowledge and information maps of the organization.

Complimenting the knowledge/information audit, environmental scanning is how managers keep in touch with their external environment as well as with what their
own organization is doing; understanding these issues allows the manager to initiate change in response to what he learns. Information professionals may use
scanning both in their roles as managers of their own departments and as providers of information to other staff involved in monitoring the environment. Environmental Scanning will explore the theoretical issues associated with identifying the types and sources of information relevant to departmental and organizational scanning needs as well as the practical issues associated with collecting that information. There is no single right or wrong way to conduct an
environmental scan. It can be as simple as regularly surfing Web sites and reading magazines. Or it can be as sophisticated as conducting formal literature reviews, distributing surveys, and convening focus groups. Methods and techniques for collecting information about an organization’s internal and external environment will be discussed. The organization’s financial and human resources as well as its strategic priorities should determine the size and scope of the project.

Both environmental scanning and knowledge/information audit are valuable tools for Information Managers.

Required Textbook:

Choo, C. W. 2002. Information Management for the Intelligent Organization: The Art of scanning the Environment. 3rd ed.
Henczel, S. 2001. The Information Audit: A Practical Guide.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INFM%20732%20Srikantaiah%20Spring%202009.pdf

Management of Information Programs and Services

Instructor:

T. Kanti Srikantaiah

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The course is an introduction to management dealing with various aspects of management focusing on planning, organizing, leading and controlling. The course
introduces the evolution of management, innovative management for the changing world, management styles and leadership, managerial planning, goal setting and decision making. The course also focuses on designing adaptive organizations responding to change, global environment, diversity, and utilizing the appropriate technology to provide effective management for results in information programs and services.

Required Textbook:

Daft, R. L. 2010. Management. 10th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/infm_612_online_course_syllabus3-1.pdf