Digital Archiving and Preservation: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Patricia Galloway

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The course will focus upon what happens to electronic records from all sources, including preservation reformatting and digital library creation, once they have crossed the “archival threshold” (whether actually or figuratively) for permanent retention. The course will cover media refreshment, conversion to neutral formats vs. emulation to retain original format, migration, migration on demand; significant properties of digital objects, what they are and their importance for preservation; format and metadata repositories and the use of metadata in digital archives; digital signatures, message digests, authenticity, and reauthentication in the long-term preservation of electronic records; and electronic records archival repository construction, use, and administration. Projects based on the iSchool institutional repository and the UTDR will be undertaken by students as case studies. Students will also be introduced to how existing standard practices in the information technology field are being adapted to archival requirements: code versioning, vaulting, and escrow, data warehousing, text and data mining, web crawling, knowledge management, IT auditing. Issues of access, including privacy and open records in the context of World Wide Web standards and digital library initiatives, will also be addressed.

Required Textbook:

Jones, R., Andrew, T., MacColl, J. 2006. The Institutional Repository.
Farmer, D., Venema, W. 2005. Forensic Discovery. (online)
Harvey, R. 2010. Digital Curation: A How-to-do-it Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/galloway/2014/spring/INF392K/index.html

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Appraisal and Selection of Records: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Patricia Galloway

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The Appraisal and Selection course will treat paper records and those in other media, including electronic records. I plan to focus critically upon the following themes: what is the traditional theoretical basis for appraisal of archival materials, both records and manuscripts, and the social setting for its emergence; what were the effects of the shift to a “documentation strategy” as social history gained importance after the 1960s in the US and elsewhere; what differences are there in appraising personal as opposed to organizational records; what are the changes implied and entailed by electronic records in both organizational and personal arenas; and what have been the impacts of changes in archival practice on the structure of the archival record. Students will participate in class appraisal exercises and investigate appraisal practices in existing archives to discover what kinds of appraisal decisions are made in real-world environments, what constraints lead to such decisions, and how (and when and if!) archivists document their appraisal decisions.

Required Textbook:

Burton, A. 2005. Archive Stories: Facts, Fictions and the Writing of History.
Cook, T. 2011. Controlling the Past: Documenting Society and Institutions.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/galloway/2014/spring/INF389J/index.html