Survey of Information Studies: Fall 2014

Instructor:

James Howison

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

The core of this course is reading, analyzing and discussing academic articles across a broad conceptualization of Information Studies as an intellectual area. The material covered will give you a clear base of familiarity with the major research questions, approaches and genres of Information Studies. As a scholar in Information Studies you will eventually be expected to have extremely deep familiarity with your chosen areas of concentration, but (as we will see) Information Studies is a broad area and a competent Information scholar is able to intelligently appreciate and discuss research with scholars from quite different backgrounds.

Required Textbook:

Booth, W. C., Colomb, G. G., Williams, J. M. 2008. The Craft of Research, 3rd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/1124297/assignments/syllabus

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Humanities Sources and Services: Summer 2010

Instructor:

Nancy E. Friedland

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Summer 2010

Description:

The Humanities as a field of study consists of literature, language, fine arts, architecture, music, performing arts, film, religion and philosophy. This course is intended to be an introduction to the kinds of materials, print, electronic and other non-print, in the humanities that are likely to be used in libraries. Throughout the course, students are given the opportunity to examine print and electronic humanities reference sources. This course also provides insight into the practices, procedures, and problems of humanities libraries.

Required Textbook:

Hock, R. 2010. The Extreme Searcher’s Internet Handbook: a guide for the serious searcher, 3rd ed.
searcher. 3rd ed.
Mann, T. 2005. The Oxford Guide to Library Research.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/LIS-901-Humanities-S10-Friedland.pdf

Great Collections of New York City: Summer 2014

Instructor:

Kyle P. Triplett

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Summer 2014

Description:

This course introduces students to special collections in a variety of significant research institutions in New York City. It does so through guided visits to repositories where the class will meet curators, see representative examples, and hear from professional staff about issues associated with the institutions visited. In the class sessions and in assignments, students will review trends and issues in special collections. The course is largely experiential and participatory. This class is particularly valuable to those planning to pursue rare book librarianship or curatorial careers in special collections, but would also benefit those interested in research libraries in general. The course will give valuable access and exposure to important New York institutions, while challenging the students to think critically and creatively about the roles of special collections.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/519-Great-Collections-of-NYC-Summer-2014-Triplett.pdf