Descriptive Bibliography & Rare Book Cataloging: Spring 2014

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The purpose of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of descriptive bibliography and to teach them to prepare detailed descriptions of printed books using these methods as well as library cataloging rules established by Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) (DCRM(B)). Lectures, videos, and rare books in the Grolier Club’s collection will be used to illustrate the physical characteristics of printed books (e.g., paper, typography, illustration processes, and binding); presswork and other production processes (e.g., composition, typesetting, and imposition); and the life of the book after its production, especially provenance evidence from inscriptions, bookplates, and other unique marks. Emphasis will be placed on developing a technical vocabulary to describe the physical aspects of printed books.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create detailed catalog descriptions of printed books and other special collections material according to descriptive bibliographical principles and DCRM(B) standards. Students will also gain a good grounding in the theory and methods of descriptive bibliography, learn how it informs and differs from rare book cataloging, and evaluate current cataloging practices and online retrieval systems on the basis of their treatment of printed books and other special collections material.

Required Textbook:

Baines, P., Haslam, A. 2005. Type & Typography, 2nd ed.
Carter, J. 2004. ABC for Book Collectors, 8th ed.
Library of Congress. 2007. Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books). (online)
Gaskell, P. 1995. A New Introduction to Bibliography.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/901-Rare-Book-Cataloging.pdf

Rare Book and Special Collections Librarianship: Spring 2014

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This course is meant as a practical introduction to the field of rare book and special collections librarianship. Over the course of fourteen weeks, we will define rare books and special collections, learn about the different types of materials housed in special collections, and talk about what it means to be a rare book and special collections librarian. We will examine many aspects of the field, including collection development, description and access, preservation and conservation, security, and outreach and promotion. By the end of the course, you will have gained an understanding of the current issues and best
practices in rare book and special collections librarianship.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/713-Rare-Book-and-Spec.-Coll.-Librararianship.pdf

Creating Exhibitions of Rare Books and Other Special Collections Materials: Fall 2011

Instructor:

Eric Holzenberg

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Fall 2011

Description:

While this course considers theoretical issues of conceptualization and criticism, it essentially provides practical, hands-on, experience with the steps necessary to create a successful exhibition of rare book/special collections material. Major topics are planning, implementation, evaluation, and documentation. The course is appropriate for students who are preparing for curatorial careers in rare book/ special collections units.

Required Textbook:

Brown, M. E., Power, R. 2006. Exhibits in Libraries: A Practical Guide.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/652-Exhibitions-and-Catalogues-F11.pdf

Contemporary Artists’ Books: Summer 2014

Instructor:

Constance Woo

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Summer 2014

Description:

This course will investigate the contemporary world of artists’ books and what it means to build a collection in this genre. It will begin by looking at essential questions such as what the term “artists’ books” has come to mean, what are its historical precedents and contexts in the art world, why it is a 20th-century phenomenon, and perhaps most importantly, what are the principles and criteria of selection and appraisal.

It will look at the practical side of the field: collecting policies, public mission and outreach, the marketplace, dealers, and business ethics. We will also take a look at the logistics of stewardship over this special category of books: housing, preservation, cataloging, promotion and access.

In order to get a real ‘tincture’ of these works and to gain a better understanding of their special requirements, we will have several laboratory sessions at the LIU-Brooklyn Campus to examine the material and technical aspects of an artist’s book. Examples from its special collection of artists’ books will be investigated, and the course will culminate with the making of an original, individual artist’s book.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/LIS-616-syllabus-Summer-2014.pdf

Great Collections of New York City: Summer 2014

Instructor:

Kyle P. Triplett

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Summer 2014

Description:

This course introduces students to special collections in a variety of significant research institutions in New York City. It does so through guided visits to repositories where the class will meet curators, see representative examples, and hear from professional staff about issues associated with the institutions visited. In the class sessions and in assignments, students will review trends and issues in special collections. The course is largely experiential and participatory. This class is particularly valuable to those planning to pursue rare book librarianship or curatorial careers in special collections, but would also benefit those interested in research libraries in general. The course will give valuable access and exposure to important New York institutions, while challenging the students to think critically and creatively about the roles of special collections.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/519-Great-Collections-of-NYC-Summer-2014-Triplett.pdf