Human-Computer Interaction: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Jacek Gwizdka

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

This course will introduce you to human-computer interaction theories and design processes. The emphasis will be on applied user experience (UX) design. The course will present an iterative evaluation-centered UX lifecycle and will introduce you to a broader notion of UX, including usability, usefulness, and emotional impact. The lifecycle should be viewed as template intended to be instantiated in many different ways to match the constraints of a particular development project. The UX lifecycle activities we will cover include contextual inquiry and analysis, requirements extraction, design-informing models, design thinking, ideation, sketching, conceptual design, and formative evaluation.

Required Textbook:

Hartson, H. R., Pyla, P. S. 2012. The UX Book: Process and Guidelines for Ensuring a Quality User Experience.

Link to Syllabus:

https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/1103529/assignments/syllabus

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Human-Computer Interaction Design Methods: Fall 2012

Instructor:

Tamara L. Clegg

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2012

Description:

This course covers methods of user-centered design, including understanding user needs, ideation, contextual design, participatory design, iterative prototyping, and visual design. Readings will include journal and conference papers, book chapters, government documents, commercial websites, and more. All students will be expected to complete small group in-class exercises, class discussions, “design workout” homework, a poster presentation, and final group project presentation/prototype.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INST632-Fall2012-Clegg.docx

Fundamentals of Human-Computer Interaction: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Leah Findlater

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of human-computer interaction, user interface design, and usability analysis. Students will learn principles and guidelines for usability, quantitative and qualitative analysis methods, and apply them through critiques of existing interfaces and development of new ones. Topics covered will also include cognitive models, task analysis, psychology, experimental design, and prototyping methods.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/syllabus-inst631-sp13.pdf

Information Audits and Environmental Scans: Spring 2009

Instructor:

T. Kanti Srikantaiah

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

An information audit is the process of reviewing the information environment of an organization to identify the information needs of individuals within an organization as well as those of the organization itself. It identifies information created within the organization and assesses its value. It reviews the use of
internal and external information resources. It maps information flows and develops knowledge and information maps of the organization.

Complimenting the knowledge/information audit, environmental scanning is how managers keep in touch with their external environment as well as with what their
own organization is doing; understanding these issues allows the manager to initiate change in response to what he learns. Information professionals may use
scanning both in their roles as managers of their own departments and as providers of information to other staff involved in monitoring the environment. Environmental Scanning will explore the theoretical issues associated with identifying the types and sources of information relevant to departmental and organizational scanning needs as well as the practical issues associated with collecting that information. There is no single right or wrong way to conduct an
environmental scan. It can be as simple as regularly surfing Web sites and reading magazines. Or it can be as sophisticated as conducting formal literature reviews, distributing surveys, and convening focus groups. Methods and techniques for collecting information about an organization’s internal and external environment will be discussed. The organization’s financial and human resources as well as its strategic priorities should determine the size and scope of the project.

Both environmental scanning and knowledge/information audit are valuable tools for Information Managers.

Required Textbook:

Choo, C. W. 2002. Information Management for the Intelligent Organization: The Art of scanning the Environment. 3rd ed.
Henczel, S. 2001. The Information Audit: A Practical Guide.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INFM%20732%20Srikantaiah%20Spring%202009.pdf