Rare Book Cataloging and Descriptive Bibliography: Spring 2016

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2016

Description:

The purpose of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of descriptive bibliography and to teach them to prepare detailed descriptions of printed books using these methods as well as library cataloging rules established by Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) (DCRM(B)). Lectures, videos, and rare books in the Grolier Club’s collection will be used to illustrate the physical characteristics of printed books (e.g., paper, typography, illustration processes, and binding); presswork and other production processes (e.g., composition, typesetting, and imposition); and the life of the book after its production, especially provenance evidence from inscriptions, bookplates, and other unique marks. Emphasis will be placed on developing a technical vocabulary to describe the physical aspects of printed books.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create detailed catalog descriptions of printed books and other special collections material according to descriptive bibliographical principles and DCRM(B) standards. Students will also gain a good grounding in the theory and methods of descriptive bibliography, learn how it informs and differs from rare book cataloging, and evaluate current cataloging practices and online retrieval systems on the basis of their treatment of printed books and other special collections material.

Required Textbook:

Carter, John. 2006. ABC for Book Collectors, 8th ed. Download.
Library of Congress. 2011. Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books). Download.
Gaskell, Philip. 1995. A New Introduction to Bibliography.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/709-Rare-Book-Cataloging-and-Desc.-Bib.-Pena-Spring-2016.pdf

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Introduction to Knowledge Organization: Spring 2017

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2017

Description:

This course serves as an introduction to the principles of knowledge organization in a library and information center setting. It emphasizes understanding the function of catalogs of all kinds, indexes, bibliographies and Web browsers, and acquiring the ability to use and interpret these tools effectively. Students will be introduced to bibliographic utilities, online catalogs and indexes, the World Wide Web as a knowledge organization tool, the principles of metadata, and various current standards for organizing knowledge and information, including Dublin Core, MARC formats, Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2), Resource Description and Access (RDA), Library of Congress Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, Dewey Decimal Classification, and Library of Congress Classification.

Required Textbook:

Miller, Steven J. 2011. Metadata for Digital Collections: A How-To-Do-Manual.

Taylor, Arlene G., and Daniel N. Joudrey. 2009. The Organization of Information. 3rd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/512-Intro.-to-Knowledge-Organization-Pena-Spring-2017.pdf

Descriptive Bibliography & Rare Book Cataloging: Spring 2014

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The purpose of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of descriptive bibliography and to teach them to prepare detailed descriptions of printed books using these methods as well as library cataloging rules established by Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) (DCRM(B)). Lectures, videos, and rare books in the Grolier Club’s collection will be used to illustrate the physical characteristics of printed books (e.g., paper, typography, illustration processes, and binding); presswork and other production processes (e.g., composition, typesetting, and imposition); and the life of the book after its production, especially provenance evidence from inscriptions, bookplates, and other unique marks. Emphasis will be placed on developing a technical vocabulary to describe the physical aspects of printed books.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create detailed catalog descriptions of printed books and other special collections material according to descriptive bibliographical principles and DCRM(B) standards. Students will also gain a good grounding in the theory and methods of descriptive bibliography, learn how it informs and differs from rare book cataloging, and evaluate current cataloging practices and online retrieval systems on the basis of their treatment of printed books and other special collections material.

Required Textbook:

Baines, P., Haslam, A. 2005. Type & Typography, 2nd ed.
Carter, J. 2004. ABC for Book Collectors, 8th ed.
Library of Congress. 2007. Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books). (online)
Gaskell, P. 1995. A New Introduction to Bibliography.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/901-Rare-Book-Cataloging.pdf

Rare Book and Special Collections Librarianship: Spring 2014

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This course is meant as a practical introduction to the field of rare book and special collections librarianship. Over the course of fourteen weeks, we will define rare books and special collections, learn about the different types of materials housed in special collections, and talk about what it means to be a rare book and special collections librarian. We will examine many aspects of the field, including collection development, description and access, preservation and conservation, security, and outreach and promotion. By the end of the course, you will have gained an understanding of the current issues and best
practices in rare book and special collections librarianship.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/713-Rare-Book-and-Spec.-Coll.-Librararianship.pdf

History of the Book: Fall 2014

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

This course is designed primarily for students who intend to work in special collections libraries or in the antiquarian book trade. Through lectures, visits to special collections repositories, presentations byexperts, and individual and group exercises, students will become familiar with recognized landmarks of the western book and with major theoretical approaches to interpreting “the book” in its broadest sense. Students will also become acquainted with the intellectual tools of the book historian’s trade,including technical vocabulary, bibliography in its various manifestations, and key information sourcesand reference works. By the conclusion of the course, students will be able to communicate in professional terms about book history with their peers, with typical users of special collections libraries, and with the general public. Prerequisite: LIS 510 or LIS 511.

While there is a theoretical book history component to the course, emphasis will place upon studying the book as object, i.e., the physical book itself. Less emphasis will be given to current theories of authorship, reading, and other aspects of book history that have become so popular in cultural and literary studies in recent years.

Required Textbook:

Carter, J. 2004. ABC for Book Collectors, 8th ed.
Chappell, W., Bringhurst, R. 2000. A Short History of the Print Word, 2nd ed.
Howard, N. 2009. The Book: The Life Story of a Technology.
Steinberg, S. H. 1996. Five Hundred Years of Printing.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/LIS-658-Syllabus-fall-2014.pdf

Knowledge Organization: Spring 2014

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This course is meant as an introduction to the principles of knowledge organization in a library and information center setting. It emphasizes understanding the function of catalogs of all kinds, indexes, bibliographies and Web browsers, and acquiring the ability to use and interpret these tools effectively. Students will be introduced to bibliographic utilities, online catalogs and indexes, the World Wide Web as a knowledge organization tool, the principles of metadata, and various current standards for organizing knowledge and information, including Dublin Core, MARC formats, Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2), Resource Description and Access (RDA), Library of Congress Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, Dewey Decimal Classification, and Library of Congress Classification.

Required Textbook:

Taylor, A. G., Joudrey, D. N. 2009. The Organization of Information. 3rd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/512-Knowledge-Organization.pdf