Audio Preservation: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Marcos Sueiro Bal

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

In this class we explore the issues related to the preservation of audio materials, both in legacy formats and in current or future or digital forms.

Required Textbook:

Bradley, K. 2009. Guidelines on the Production and Preservation of Digital Audio. Download.
Objects

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/716-Audio-Preservation-Sueiro-Bal-Spring-20152.pdf

Copyright and Library Law: Summer 2016

Instructor:

Greg Cram

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Summer 2016

Description:

This course explores copyright law and gives students a legal framework to analyze the copyright issues faced by librarians and cultural institutions. From the digitization of archives and collections to electronic reference, copyright is now a major consideration for libraries. Copyright issues are prevalent in published, unpublished and born-digital material. Instead of backing away from copyright issues to the detriment of access to content, librarians should understand and interpret copyright law so they can participate in setting institutional policies that take advantage of fair use and other exceptions granted to libraries by the law.

Required Textbook:

Hirtle, Peter B., et al. 2009. Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Guidelines for U.S. Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Download.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/740-Copyright-and-Library-Law-Cram-Summer-2016-.pdf

Technical Services Operations and Systems: Fall 2016

Instructor:

John Lindaman

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Fall 2016

Description:

The purpose of this course is to provide practical experience in Technical Services operations in libraries and information centers. The course will take place in the Thomas J. Watson Library at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, to provide hands-on work in as many facets of Technical Services as possible, and to see the specifics of how they are implemented in a large research
library.

Among the topics students will examine are: copy cataloging (both in Sierra and Connexion), library acquisitions, collection development, serials control, record loading, data manipulation, materials processing, knowledge organization, and integrated library systems. There will be some reading, but the focus will be on practice.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/LIS775-Technical-Services-Operations-and-Systems-Lindaman-Fall-2016.pdf

Rare Book Cataloging and Descriptive Bibliography: Spring 2016

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2016

Description:

The purpose of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of descriptive bibliography and to teach them to prepare detailed descriptions of printed books using these methods as well as library cataloging rules established by Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) (DCRM(B)). Lectures, videos, and rare books in the Grolier Club’s collection will be used to illustrate the physical characteristics of printed books (e.g., paper, typography, illustration processes, and binding); presswork and other production processes (e.g., composition, typesetting, and imposition); and the life of the book after its production, especially provenance evidence from inscriptions, bookplates, and other unique marks. Emphasis will be placed on developing a technical vocabulary to describe the physical aspects of printed books.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create detailed catalog descriptions of printed books and other special collections material according to descriptive bibliographical principles and DCRM(B) standards. Students will also gain a good grounding in the theory and methods of descriptive bibliography, learn how it informs and differs from rare book cataloging, and evaluate current cataloging practices and online retrieval systems on the basis of their treatment of printed books and other special collections material.

Required Textbook:

Carter, John. 2006. ABC for Book Collectors, 8th ed. Download.
Library of Congress. 2011. Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books). Download.
Gaskell, Philip. 1995. A New Introduction to Bibliography.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/709-Rare-Book-Cataloging-and-Desc.-Bib.-Pena-Spring-2016.pdf

Building Digital Libraries: Fall 2016

Instructor:

Hsin-liang (Oliver) Chen

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Fall 2016

Description:

This class will focus on developing digital libraries. During the course, we will consider the various definitions of digital libraries in theory and practice. Topics to be covered include: selection criteria, copyright, digitization, metadata, navigation, and project management. The main project will be the creation of a small digital library. Students will create fully function digital libraries. They will also appraise, select, digitize, describe, and make available digital materials. Experience with scanning equipment, imaging software, and HTML editors is helpful.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/654-Building-Digital-Libraries-Chen-Fall2016.pdf

Art Librarianship: Summer 2016

Instructor:

Stephen J. Bury

School:

Palmer School

Semester:

Summer 2016

Description:

Students will be introduced to all aspects of art librarianship, with an emphasis on reference and collection development issues. Field trips will supplement in-class lectures, exercises, and hands-on practice with print sources and databases for art, architecture, and design research.

This course will look at the art information world from the perspective of four types of users – the artist, dealer, art historian and museum or gallery curator. We will visit an auction house, an art foundation archive, art history library, and a museum library. There will also be a focus on four corresponding categories of material – the artist’s book, auction catalogue, catalogue raisonné and exhibition catalogue. We will see how these have changed over time and are changing (or not) in our increasingly digital world. We will look at the roles of art information specialists and librarians in different types of institutions and examine the question of whether or not art librarianship is a discrete sub-discipline

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/612-Art-Librarianship-Bury-Summer-2016.pdf

Institute on Map Collections: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Matthew A. Knutzen

School:

Palmer School

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

Maps are most efficient deliverers of information, dealing with the spatial dimension of events in time. Ecology, history, property, archaeology, events in the news all can be clarified by the cartographer’s artistic and/or scientific hand, on paper or on the web. This institute is an introduction to maps as information tools. We will examine maps, atlases and globes, and their collection in local and national libraries; and by private collectors and their impact on library map collections. Participants will draw upon this information and experience to investigate and evaluate specific research areas and topics.

Required Textbook:

Miller, Steven J. 2011. Metadata for Digital Collections: A How-To-Do-Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/901-Maps-Institute-Knutzen-Spring-2015.pdf