Internship in School Library: Spring 2016

Instructor:

Mega Subramaniam

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2016

Description:

Opportunities to observe and participate in the operation of school libraries at the elementary and secondary levels under the supervision of certified school librarians.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lbsc_744_syllabus_spring_2016_0.pdf

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Collaborative Instructional Design and Evaluation: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Mega Subramaniam

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

Over the past several decades, the role of the school librarian has evolved to include a number of new responsibilities. One of the most important of these involves instruction–working individually and in collaboration with teachers to design, develop, and evaluate teaching and learning strategies and materials to meet a variety of instructional needs. Both historically and today, the principles of instructional systems development (ISD) provide an invaluable tool for the school librarian to use in fulfilling this instructional role, and they are introduced and explored in this course. Grounded in the assumption that instruction should be designed by teams or groups to be most effective, ISD is especially useful in supporting the librarians’ work as an “instructional partner” with teachers. A particular focus of the course is the application of ISD to designing information-based learning—that is, creating opportunities for learners to use a full range of information resources for authentic, problem-based learning.

ISD interweaves insights from systems, learning, communications, and management theories into a set of concepts and processes whose application leads to well-planned, reliable instruction. Beginning with the analysis of an instructional problem and moving systematically through a sequence of clearly defined stages, the ISD approach provides a sophisticated set of tools for designers of instruction for both education and training. The process is applicable to the development of instruction in all media formats–the newest varieties of interactive media as well as the more traditional print and audiovisual approaches. Through studying ISD theory and applying its methods to the development of a detailed plan for an instructional product, candidates in this course will master a systematic yet flexible set of principles that can be used in a variety of settings.

Required Textbook:

Wallace, V.L., and Husid, W.N. 2011. Collaborating for Inquiry-based learning: School librarians and teachers partner for student achievement.

American Association of School Librarians. 2009. Standards for the 21st-Century Learner in Action.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/742_syllabus_final_0.pdf

Seminar in School Library Administration: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Gail C. Bailey

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Development, management, and evaluation of school library programs at all levels.

Required Textbook:

American Association of School Librarians. 2009. Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs.

American Association of School Librarians and Association for Educational Communications and Technology. 1998. Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning.

Donaham, J. 2008. Enhancing Teaching and Learning: a Leadership Guide for School Library Media Specialists, 2nd ed revised.

Harada, V. H., and Yoshina, J. M. 2010. Assessing for Learning: Librarians and Teachers as Partners, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lbsc741slpadministrationbaileyspring2014_0.pdf

Selection and Evaluation of Resources for Learning: Spring 2011

Instructor:

Sheri Anita Massey

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2011

Description:

Evaluating and selecting resources for learning are complex processes that can be approached from a number of perspectives–building and maintaining an adequate collection, using limited budgetary resources wisely, and balancing the needs and requests of various client constituencies. The most important perspective–and one that can be neglected–is the instructional one: evaluating and selecting resources according to their inherent appropriateness as tools for enhancing learning and their applicability to specific instructional settings and learners’ needs in the K-12 environment.

Library media specialists (LMSs) are typically viewed by the other members of the instructional team as the experts in selecting materials and can exert enormous influence in determining which resources make their way into the classroom as well as into the library media center. In order to recommend and select materials that will truly enhance students’ learning, LMSs must have comprehensive knowledge of components and sources of effective resources for learning. In this course, a number of topics are covered to help students gain that knowledge: the nature and uses of resources for contemporary learning environments; procedures for locating and evaluating such resources; systematic planning for the use of learning resources; advantages and disadvantages of various media formats; and processes for creating collections that support the curriculum.

The course content is based upon theory and best practice; however, assignments and projects are designed to be practical and useful to students as they begin careers as library media specialists. It is recommended that all assignments be completed to respond to needs within a specific school and/or district environment

Required Textbook:

Bishop, K. 2007. The Collection Program in Schools; Concepts, Practices, and Information Sources, 4th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC641%20Spring%202011%20Sherri%20Massey.pdf

Library Media Specialists as Information Professionals: Fall 2011

Instructor:

Mega M. Subramaniam

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2011

Description:

Over the past 100 years, education in the United States has grown in size and–even more–in complexity. Part of this development has involved the developing recognition of the importance of the library media program as an integral part of the educational system. In order to function effectively within that system, school library media specialists (LMSs) must understand a number of elements that affect their position in the school: the historical, organizational, and contemporary contexts of library media programs; the principles of teaching, learning, and information literacy that underlie the library media program; and the leadership role that LMSs can play within the school community. This course introduces students to all these elements, concentrating on the various roles of the LMS in supporting student learning.

The roles are derived from the mission statement first adopted in 1988 by the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) and the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) to guide the development and improvement of library media programs nationwide. This mission statement was reaffirmed in 1998, and expanded in the revised guidelines for the field, Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs, published by the American Library Association in 2009. As stated below, the mission statement underlies the College’s School Library Media Specialization and LBSC 640, which is designed to introduce students to the specialization and to the information professions in general:

The mission of the school library media program is to ensure that students and staff are effective users of ideas and information. The school library media specialist (LMS) empowers students to be critical thinkers, enthusiastic readers, skillful researchers, and ethical users of information by:

  • collaborating with educators and students to design and teach engaging learning experiences that meet individual needs.
  • instructing students and assisting educators in using, evaluating, and producing information and ideas through active use of a broad range of appropriate tools, resources,
    and information technologies.
  • providing access to materials in all formats, including up-to-date, high-quality, varied literature to develop and strengthen a love of reading.
  • providing students and staff with instruction and resources that reflect current information needs and anticipate changes in technology and education.
  • providing leadership in the total education program and advocating for strong school library media programs as essential to meeting local, state, and national education goals.

The course also will introduce students to the Standards for the 21st Century Learner, launched by AASL in October 2007. This document outlines the skills that students need for understanding, thinking and mastering subjects; the dispositions that guide their thinking and intellectual behaviors; the responsibilities that reflect behaviors used by independent learners in researching, investigating and problem solving; and the self-assessment strategies that enable students to reflect on their own learning.

Required Textbook:

American Association of School Librarians. 2009. Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs.

Donham, J. 2008. Enhancing Teaching and Learning: a Leadership Guide for School Library Media Specialists, 2nd edition revised.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20640%20Spring%202011%20Mega%20Subramanium.pdf

School Librarians as Information Professionals: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Sheri Anita Massey

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

Over the past 100 years, education in the United States has grown in size and–even more–in complexity. Part of this development has involved the developing recognition of the importance of the school library program as an integral part of the educational system. In order to function effectively within that system, school librarians must understand a number of elements that affect their position in the school: the historical, organizational, and contemporary contexts of school library programs; the principles of teaching, learning, and information literacy that underlie the school library program; and the leadership role that school librarians can play within the school community. This course introduces candidates to all these elements, concentrating on the various roles of the school librarians in supporting student learning.

The roles are derived from the mission statement first adopted in 1988, by the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) and the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) to guide the development and improvement of school library programs nationwide. This mission statement was reaffirmed in 1998, and expanded in the revised guidelines for the field, Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs, published by the American Library Association in 2009. As stated below, the mission statement underlies the College’s School Library Specialization and LBSC 640, which is designed to introduce candidates to the specialization and to the information professions in general:

The mission of the school library program is to ensure that students and staff are effective users of ideas and information. The school librarian empowers students to be critical thinkers, enthusiastic readers, skillful researchers, and ethical users of information by:

  • collaborating with educators and students to design and teach engaging learning experiences that meet individual needs.
  • instructing students and assisting educators in using, evaluating, and producing information and ideas through active use of a broad range of appropriate tools, resources, and information technologies.
  • providing access to materials in all formats, including up-to-date, high-quality, varied literature to develop and strengthen a love of reading.
  • providing students and staff with instruction and resources that reflect current information needs and anticipate changes in technology and education.
  • providing leadership in the total education program and advocating for strong school library programs as essential to meeting local, state, and national education goals.

The course also will introduce candidates to the Standards for the 21st Century Learner, launched by AASL in October 2007. This document outlines the skills that candidates need for understanding, thinking and mastering subjects; the dispositions that guide their thinking and intellectual behaviors; the responsibilities that reflect behaviors used by independent learners in researching, investigating and problem solving; and the self-assessment strategies that enable candidates to reflect on their own learning

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lbsc_640_-_intro_to_slmps_-_syllabus_-_spring_2015_web.pdf

Administration of School Library Media Centers: Fall 2012

Instructor:

Mindy M. Holland

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Fall 2012

Description:

Problems, practices, and research in the organization and management of school media centers. Standards, programs and services, facilities, policies, budgets, human and organizational factors.

Required Textbook:

Martin, B. S. & Zannier, M. 2009. Fundamentals of School Library Media Management.
Morris, B. J. 2010. Administering the School Library Media Center, 5th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/informationstudies/files/IST_676_Holland_Fall2012.pdf