Copyright and Libraries: Summer 2007

Instructor:

D.E. Perushek

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Summer 2007

Description:

Examines issues in copyright and intellectual property pertaining to libraries of all sorts from the perspective of both theory and praxis. Beginning with a history of copyright, we will analyze theories of copyright and its application, especially in the digital age. The practical aspects of copyright as it applies to licensing contracts for electronic resources will be explored, including the economics of licensing. Attention will be given to interpretations of copyright law, fair use, liability and the responsibility of the individual librarian to introduce copyright concepts to library users. The approach will be worldwide, but case studies and current issues in copyright and intellectual property in the United States will predominate.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/693_perushek.pdf

Copyright and Library Law: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Greg Cram

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This course explores copyright law and gives students a legal framework to analyze the copyright issues faced by librarians and cultural institutions. From the digitization of archives and collections to electronic reference, copyright is now a major consideration for libraries. Copyright issues are prevalent in published, unpublished and born-digital material. Instead of backing away from copyright issues to the detriment of access to content, librarians should understand and interpret copyright law so they can participate in setting institutional policies that take advantage of fair use and other exceptions granted to libraries by the law.

Required Textbook:

Hirtle, P. B. 2009. Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Guidelines for U.S. Libraries, Archives, and Museums. (online)

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Copyright-and-Library-Law-Syllabus-Spring-2014-v2014-02-27.pdf

Publishing, Knowledge Institutions and Society: E-Revolutions?

Instructor:

Dorothea Salo

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Description:

  • Sufficient knowledge of US copyright law to advise digitization projects, uncertain authors and instructors, and digital archivists on common, relatively simple fair-use, orphan-works, reuse, and (re)publishing dilemmas
  • Sufficient knowledge of current trends, processes, and standards in trade and scholarly publishing to advise would-be authors, advocate for balanced laws and policies, and navigate professional publishing opportunities
  • Sufficient knowledge of intellectual-property-related dilemmas, movements, and legislation (past and pending) to be a thoughtful information advocate and information-agency leader
  • Sufficient knowledge of publishing trends to inform collection-development decisions in academic, public, K-12, and special-library settings
  • The ability to assess a rapidly-evolving situation, explain it clearly and succinctly to others, and devise feasible responses to it
  • The ability to devise a well-reasoned long-range scenario and a strategy to respond to it
  • The ability to write a journal-quality book review

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://files.dsalo.info/640syll2014.pdf

Electronic Resource Management and Licensing: Fall 2011

Instructor:

Sarah T. Roberts

School:

iSchool at Illinois

Semester:

Fall 2011

Description:

This is a three-credit course on digital librarianship focusing on licensed, vendor-created electronic resources. This course is designed to give students an overview of the managerial, standards, legal, and technological issues related to the management of licensed resources such as e-journals, e-books, full text databases, digital audio and video files, and e-references resources. It has a significant copyright and licensing component. The course is useful for students in all library tracks. The course has no prerequisites and no technical background is required, although we will cover some technical material from a managerial perspective.

Required Textbook:

Harris, L.E. 2009. Licensing Digital Content: A Practical Guide for Librarians, 2nd ed.
Litman, J. 2001. Digital Copyright.
Russell, C. 2004. Complete Copyright: An Everyday Guide For Librarians.

Link to Syllabus:

http://wiseeducation.org/media/documents/2013/4/755_Syllabus.pdf