Legal Issues in Managing Information: Fall 2012

Instructor:

Corey D. Williams

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2012

Description:

This course is designed to analyze legal issues related to the management of information in contexts in which information professionals are likely to be involved— such as libraries, government agencies, archives, information management, and corporate settings. In an age defined by information, knowledge of the legal issues that establish how information is required to be protected, maintained, collected, stored, and accessed is extremely important. While there are far too many laws related to information and different issues related to management of information for this course to cover every specific context, the course will provide an overview of some of the most important legal issues in managing information so that students will be able to apply the course to particular professional situations that they may encounter

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lbsc735-fall2012-williams.pdf

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Virtual Librarianship: Fall 2012

Instructor:

Diane Nahl

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Fall 2012

Description:

The focus is on professionalization in this hybrid technology-intensive seminar that takes place in a classroom lab, online on the Web and in the immersive virtual world platform of Second Life (SL). The seminar allows students to explore technology innovations in librarianship, including Web 2.0 applications, online professional development services, and avatar-mediated library services. Conducted in a collaborative, project-based, online, inworld, and classroom workshop format.

Required Textbook:

Kane, L. T. 2011. Working in the Virtual Stacks: The New Library and Information Science.
Gleick, J. 2011. The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/694_nahl_f12.docx

Introduction to Multimedia Technology & Resources: Fall 2006

Instructor:

Carol S.Y. Kellett

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Fall 2006

Description:

Introduces the latest and specialized technologies for providing, managing, and designing
information services within a library environment. Provides basic experience in desktop
productivity software and web publishing, bibliographic database software, and qualitative and
quantitative data analysis.

Libraries are in the business of not only providing information resources and services to its users but to give them information literacy skills that extend beyond the walls of the library and university into everyday life. Librarians are the heart and soul of delivering these services to library users and must therefore be thoroughly familiar with the technology that resides “underneath” the delivery of information services.

Librarians catalog and index vast collections of materials, provide tools to find these materials (online catalog, tutorials, guides), and instruct library users on how to find information. Librarians must be able to read and synthesize vast amounts of information sources and materials and present them to library users in a manner that they understand – that the role and function of the library and librarian is to guide the library user in evaluating the creation of knowledge.

This course presents an overview of basic tools and techniques which are necessary in almost all library environments and for most MLISc classes. Topics include a general discussion of both graphical and character-based operating systems, the application of word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software in information environments, internet applications such as email and web browsers, the creation of HTML documents within a unix operating system environment, and ongoing discussions on information technology and its use in libraries.

Required Textbook:

Miller, Steven J. 2011. Metadata for Digital Collections: A How-To-Do-Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/694_kellett.pdf

Technology for Information Management: 2012

Instructor:

William Saffady

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

2012

Description:

This course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive introduction to information management technologies that are significant for library science and allied disciplines, such as archives administration, records management, knowledge management, and information systems analysis. The course emphasizes computers but other technologies—such as networking, video, facsimile, and document reproduction—will also be covered. The course will deal in a systematic manner with technical terms and concepts that information professionals must understand. The characteristics of particular systems and their current status in information management will be explained. Vendors and industry trends will be covered. Classes will consist of lectures and discussions on topics outlined below. Assignments will provide hand-on computer experience.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/508-syllabus-Saffady.pdf

Solving Problems in Information Management: Spring 2013

Instructor:

Susan J. Winter

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

Expertise – as the basis for your contribution to an organization, it is key to making your next career move; as a basis for credibility, it is core to your ability to develop and implement IT enabled solutions to business problems; as a basis for influence and power, it is central to your ability to be a leader. Becoming an expert in your area of specialization is foundational to your career progress and success.

Yet, it has been said that it takes 10 years of sustained effort to become an expert. Why? What is different about experts? Is it just a matter of knowing more or are there other ways that experts are different than novices? If so, what are the differences and how can you develop and document those capabilities?

A primary goal of Master of Information Management is to improve your understanding of what it takes to be an expert and facilitate your development as an expert in your area of specialization – and in doing so to accelerate your efforts to move toward your career goals.

The Capstone Experience (INFM 737) provides you with additional opportunities to develop different aspects of your expertise. Through a variety of readings, assignments, and activities you will learn about the nature of expertise (in general and in Information Management). You will also develop the knowledge and abilities you need to be an expert within a given industry and IM specialization.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INFM737-Spring2013-Winter.doc

Information Audits and Environmental Scans: Spring 2009

Instructor:

T. Kanti Srikantaiah

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

An information audit is the process of reviewing the information environment of an organization to identify the information needs of individuals within an organization as well as those of the organization itself. It identifies information created within the organization and assesses its value. It reviews the use of
internal and external information resources. It maps information flows and develops knowledge and information maps of the organization.

Complimenting the knowledge/information audit, environmental scanning is how managers keep in touch with their external environment as well as with what their
own organization is doing; understanding these issues allows the manager to initiate change in response to what he learns. Information professionals may use
scanning both in their roles as managers of their own departments and as providers of information to other staff involved in monitoring the environment. Environmental Scanning will explore the theoretical issues associated with identifying the types and sources of information relevant to departmental and organizational scanning needs as well as the practical issues associated with collecting that information. There is no single right or wrong way to conduct an
environmental scan. It can be as simple as regularly surfing Web sites and reading magazines. Or it can be as sophisticated as conducting formal literature reviews, distributing surveys, and convening focus groups. Methods and techniques for collecting information about an organization’s internal and external environment will be discussed. The organization’s financial and human resources as well as its strategic priorities should determine the size and scope of the project.

Both environmental scanning and knowledge/information audit are valuable tools for Information Managers.

Required Textbook:

Choo, C. W. 2002. Information Management for the Intelligent Organization: The Art of scanning the Environment. 3rd ed.
Henczel, S. 2001. The Information Audit: A Practical Guide.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INFM%20732%20Srikantaiah%20Spring%202009.pdf

Strategic Information Management: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Vikas Sahasrabudhe

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Over the last few years, the global environment has been transformed in large part by leveraging capabilities of information resources (IR). Today’s environment is often called the information age, knowledge economy, digital businesses, digital markets, etc. Labels aside, information resources are not just back-office process enablers any more, but they can be of strategic importance to any enterprise. To be ready to meet the challenges of this environment, this course
provides an introduction to strategic management of information resources.

Required Textbook:

Pearlson, K. E., Saunders, C. S. 2012. Managing & Using Information Systems: A Strategic Approach.
Austin, R. D., Nolan, R. L., O’Donnell, S. 2009. The Adventures of an IT leader.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/infm620-spring_2014.pdf