Contemporary Social Media: Fall 2016

Instructor:

Scott W. H. Young and Doralyn Rossmann

School:

Montana State University

Semester:

Fall 2016

Description:

This interactive course explores social media from the perspectives of information analysis and community building. Students will learn the theory and practice of civic
engagement and community building through social media. Ideally suited for individuals interested in working with nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, healthcare and nursing, community health, arts and humanities, government, and remote or rural communities. Utilizing a service learning approach, students will engage in the theories and methods related to social media community building through both in-class discussion and community outreach.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://scottwhyoung.com/syllabi/contemporary-social-media-fall-2016/

Download Syllabus:

This syllabus was submitted by Young who gave permission for it to be uploaded to this site.

Creating Information Infrastructures: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Katy Lawley

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

Creating Information Infrastructures introduces students to the foundations of acquiring and managing collections, information structures, indexing and discovery systems in Library and Information Studies. The course introduces theoretical concepts, trends, systems, and technologies central to this area of the field and equips students with the skills and conceptual
background to create and manage information systems and services. The course is centered on the exploration of library and archival information systems, with students working to create,
index, and produce their own objects and descriptive metadata for physical and digital contexts. In order to introduce students to the broad world of information institutions, how they
manage resources and provide access for their users the course is broken into four thematic areas:

  • Terms of reference: What are information institutions, and in what social context do they exist?
  • Get it: What kinds of resources do information institutions manage, and how do they come to have them?
  • Find it: How do institutions manage these resources, what conceptual and functional skills are required for this work, and what benefits and limitations exist for each approach (e.g., automated vs. manual)?
  • Serve it: How do information institutions provide access to these resources in physical and Web-based settings?

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lawleylbsc671syllabus.spring2015.pdf

Literature and Materials for Young Adults: Spring 2011

Instructor:

Myra A. Paul

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2011

Description:

This course is a survey of literature and digital resources for older children and adolescents. We will review criteria for evaluating and using such materials as they relate to the needs, interests, reading and other capabilities of today’s adolescent

Required Textbook:

Nilsen, A. P., Donelson, K. L. 2009. Literature for Today’s Young Adults, 8th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20646%20Spring%202011%20Myra%20Paul.pdf

Children’s Literature and Materials: Fall 2013

Instructor:

Edith Ching

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

This course surveys literature and other materials for children and youth as they relate to the needs, interests, reading abilities and other capabilities of readers through middle school (grade 8). Criteria for evaluating and using such materials will also be discussed.

A driving question that we will continually revisit throughout this course is: Is children’s literature defined by the act of children reading it or are there specific characteristics that make this a unique literature?

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20645.doc

Integrating Technology into Learning and Teaching: Fall 2012

Instructor:

June Ahn

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2012

Description:

Through discussions, research, readings, hands-on activities, and projects, candidates will explore a number of technologies applicable for teaching and learning. Candidates will assess the how, when, and why of infusing technology into the teaching and learning process. Topics include teaching with technology through the exploration of various hardware, software, multi-media, and on-line services developed for schools and libraries. The course will culminate in a presentation of the candidate’s knowledge and skills in facilitating the application of technology in a learning environment.

Required Textbook:

Jenkins, H. 2006. Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. (PDF)

Kamenetz, A. 2010. Learning, Freedom, and the Web. (Free eBook)

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC642-Fall2012-ahn.pdf

Selection and Evaluation of Resources for Learning: Spring 2011

Instructor:

Sheri Anita Massey

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2011

Description:

Evaluating and selecting resources for learning are complex processes that can be approached from a number of perspectives–building and maintaining an adequate collection, using limited budgetary resources wisely, and balancing the needs and requests of various client constituencies. The most important perspective–and one that can be neglected–is the instructional one: evaluating and selecting resources according to their inherent appropriateness as tools for enhancing learning and their applicability to specific instructional settings and learners’ needs in the K-12 environment.

Library media specialists (LMSs) are typically viewed by the other members of the instructional team as the experts in selecting materials and can exert enormous influence in determining which resources make their way into the classroom as well as into the library media center. In order to recommend and select materials that will truly enhance students’ learning, LMSs must have comprehensive knowledge of components and sources of effective resources for learning. In this course, a number of topics are covered to help students gain that knowledge: the nature and uses of resources for contemporary learning environments; procedures for locating and evaluating such resources; systematic planning for the use of learning resources; advantages and disadvantages of various media formats; and processes for creating collections that support the curriculum.

The course content is based upon theory and best practice; however, assignments and projects are designed to be practical and useful to students as they begin careers as library media specialists. It is recommended that all assignments be completed to respond to needs within a specific school and/or district environment

Required Textbook:

Bishop, K. 2007. The Collection Program in Schools; Concepts, Practices, and Information Sources, 4th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC641%20Spring%202011%20Sherri%20Massey.pdf