Literature and Materials for Young Adults: Spring 2011

Instructor:

Myra A. Paul

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2011

Description:

This course is a survey of literature and digital resources for older children and adolescents. We will review criteria for evaluating and using such materials as they relate to the needs, interests, reading and other capabilities of today’s adolescent

Required Textbook:

Nilsen, A. P., Donelson, K. L. 2009. Literature for Today’s Young Adults, 8th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20646%20Spring%202011%20Myra%20Paul.pdf

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Young Voices in Times of War: Literature for Children and Young Adults: Spring 2009

Instructor:

Jan Kamiya

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

During times of war, children and teens are forced to grow up more quickly than they would during times of peace. Many will have to make difficult choices and face adult issues. This course will focus on stories told through unique voices of children and young adults who happened to grow up while the world they knew around them was radically changing. When contemporary children and teens read about the impact war has on the fictional characters (especially those of similar ages) as well as true stories of people who grew up in the midst of war, they will inevitably from a literary relationship with and develop empathy for the characters they read about. By humanizing “the other” through reading, we can hope to instill in upcoming generations the importance of cultural understanding an the necessity of teaching peace in an increasingly globalized world.

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/LIS_693_Young_Voices_Kamiya.pdf

Asian American Resources for Children & Youth: Summer 2011

Instructor:

Nyla Fujii-Babb

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Summer 2011

Description:

The course focuses on an examination of Asian American resources for children and youth and for the library professionals working with them. It includes an overview of the socio-historical roots of various Asian groups in the United States; a survey of trends and issues related to multi ethnic authoring and publishing; the creation of and application of evaluative criteria for information in this area; and an exploration of curricular and library program promotion of these resources.

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/689_fujiibabb_SS11.pdf

Books & Media for Young Adults: Fall 2013

Instructor:

Rebecca Knuth

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

Books and other media for young people of junior and senior high school age. History and criticism of young adult literature. Selecting library and classroom materials. Controversial issues.

Required Textbook:

Nilsen, A. P., Donelson, K. L. 2009. Literature for Today’s Young Adults, 8th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/682_knuth_f13.pdf

Materials for Young Adults: Summer 2012

Instructor:

Stephanie Shteirman and MaryEllen Minichiello

School:

Southern Connecticut

Semester:

Summer 2012

Description:

The needs, interests, and motivation of young people as related to reading are examined through a critical study of resources suitable for teens.

Required Textbook:

Layne, S. L. 2009. Igniting a Passion for Reading: Successful Strategies for Building Lifetime Readers.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ares.southernct.edu//ils/uploads/textWidget/wysiwyg/documents/ILS_512-Syllabus-Summer_2012-Shteirman_Minichiello.pdf

Materials for Young Adults

Instructor:

School:

Rutgers

Semester:

Description:

What is a “young adult”? What, then, is “young adult literature”? We will debate and discuss both questions, but there is one term that is sure to be mentioned often for both meanings of “young adult”: “change.” If nothing else, young adulthood is a time in which a person develops in new ways, and young adult literature itself has gone through great rising and falling waves. This class will take a unique approach to that theme of change by looking at YA literature through the eyes of the distinct and at times misaligned constituencies who judge it: publishers; reviewers; librarians; teachers; parents; and young adults themselves. In so doing we will acquaint ourselves with both classic and new young adult books, and thus students who are training to use books with teenagers will have a solid grounding in this ever-shape-shifting field. YALSA, the ALA division most relevant for this class, treats Young Adult books as written for readers ages 12-18, and that will be our guide.

Required Textbook:

Sutton, P. 2010. A Family of Readers..
Aronson. 2001. Exploding the Myth.

Link to Syllabus:

http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/images/syllabus_548.pdf