The Engaged Intellectual: An Introduction to Research and Academic Work: Fall 2013

Instructor:

June Ahn

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

This is a required, 3-credit course for doctoral students in the College of Information Studies. The course is run as an intensive seminar that is intended for first year PhD students.

In this seminar, students will explore a series of issues that confront academics who work in research universities. The course is an “Introduction to Research”, but the process of research is more than a recipe of rote analytical procedures. Instead, research is intimately linked to one’s beliefs about knowledge, scholarly community, and the impact one wants to make on the world.

In this course, students will examine academic life with a particular focus on what it means to undertake research, teaching, and service. By the conclusion of the course, students will have a better understanding of what tenure-track faculty do and how they work in the academy. Students will also explicate how they intend to structure their own professional careers.

Students will read, analyze, and discuss several issues in this semester. First, students will explore and debate what it means to conduct quality research, write for academic audiences, and contribute knowledge in the academy. Second, students will examine the debates around theory, research quality, and constructions of knowledge. Third, students will consider teaching, service, and their roles as academics in the field of Information Studies. The course will ask students to consider and define their identities as individuals, researchers, and teachers. Students will explicate how they see themselves as developing scholars, both at the present time and in their professional future.

Required Textbook:

Crotty, M. 1998. The Foundations of Social Research.
Graff, G., Birkenstein, C. 2009. They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 2nd ed.
O’Meara, K., Terosky, A. L., Neumann, A. 2008. ASHE Higher Education Report, Special Issue: Faculty Careers and Work Lives: A Professional Growth Perspective.
Sword, H. 2012. Stylish Academic Writing.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INST%20800%20-%20Engaged%20Intellectual%202013.pdf

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Research Methods in Library and Information Science: Spring 2011

Instructor:

Peter Liebscher

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2011

Description:

This course covers the techniques and strategies of research as applied to the definition, investigation, and evaluation of information problems. It explores the nature, role and methods of scholarly research and provides a basic introduction to scientific inquiry, hypothesis formulation, and some statistical testing. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods of research design methods are considered from the aspects
of implementation, analysis, and interpretation.

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20701-INFM%20718%20M%20Spring%202011%20Peter%20Liebscher.pdf

Research Methods: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Abebe Rorissa

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

Basic research methods and statistics for students entering the information science professions. Covers descriptive and inferential statistics through correlation and regression; basic research process methods, quantitative and qualitative, and the creation of grant or research proposals.

Required Textbook:

Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. 2015. Understanding Basic Statistics, 9th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/informationstudies/files/608_Rorissa_Fa14.pdf

Research in Library and Information Science: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Mike Koenig

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The course focuses on theoretical and applied research design, research methodologies, and the evaluation of research in library and information science. In the process it reviews existing research in the field. It includes the preparation of a research proposal, and exposure to the statistical analysis of research data. In addition the course emphasizes tools and techniques for decision making.

Required Textbook:

Powell, R. R., Connaway, L. S. 2004. Basic research methods for librarians, 4th ed.
Rowntree, D. 2004. Statistics without tears: A primer for non-mathematicians.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/514-Research-Methods-Koenig-spring-2014.pdf

Introduction to Research Methods: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Beth St. Jean

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

In this survey course, we will examine the entire scope of the research process, beginning with reviewing the existing literature to identify significant gaps, coming up with novel and important research questions to investigate, and preparing a research proposal. We will then discuss many of the different methods that information scientists use to investigate research questions, including interviews, focus groups, diaries, surveys, and experiments. Toward the end of the semester, we will cover the processes of writing up and presenting reports of completed research.

Required Textbook:

Pickard, A. J. 2013. Research Methods in Information, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/inst701_syllabus_stjean_spring_2014_final.pdf

Research Methods in Library and Information Science: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Sung Un Kim

School:

Catholic University of America

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

Covers the analysis and evaluation of research studies in library and information science and the application of analytical and evaluative techniques. Surveys research processes, including problem definition, design, sampling, measurement, data collection and analysis, and the applications of research findings to solving practical problems of libraries and information centers. Includes research design and proposal writing. No previous statistical or research
background required.

Required Textbook:

Connaway, L. S., & Powell, R. R. 2010. Basic Research Methods for Librarians, 5th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://lis.cua.edu/res/docs/syllabi/2012spring/LSC675KimSpring2012.pdf