Electronic Records Management: Spring 2013

Instructor:

Catherine Stollar Peters

School:

University of Albany

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

This course is an introduction to issues in record keeping in the digital age. In addition covering issues related to electronic records management, we will discuss digital curation, web archiving, personal information management, and managing electronic records in manuscript repositories.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/informationstudies/files/IST547_Peters.pdf

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Digital Curation: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Dorothea Salo

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

  • Assess, plan for, manage, and execute a small-scale data-management or digital-archiving project.
  • Assess digital data for preservability; make yes-or-no accessioning decisions.
  • Understand (and where relevant, apply) technological, economic, and social models of digital preservation and sustainability.
  • Understand forms, formats, and lifecycles of digital data across a wide breadth of contexts.
  • Evaluate software and hardware tools relevant across the data lifecycle.
  • Construct a current-awareness strategy; assimilate substantial amounts of relevant writing.
  • Self-sufficiently acquire technical knowledge.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://files.dsalo.info/668syll2014.pdf

Policy Issues in Digital Curation: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Katie Shilton

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Policy Issues in Digital Curation will explore responses to the intellectual property, privacy, and security issues related to curation and long-term preservation of digital information. Bridging law, social science, computer science, and professional practice, this course will focus on understanding and responding to copyright and other forms of intellectual property raised by preservation copies of digital data and records; dealing with complex privacy issues in digital data and records; securing integrity and trust in digital information and content throughout the information lifecycle; and implementing security for digital information in a range of contexts. Applied group and individual work will focus on developing policy and technical responses to intellectual property, privacy, trust, and security issues.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/inst641policyissuesindigitalcuration.pdf

Digital Curation: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Jane Zhang

School:

The Catholic University of America

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

This course provides an overview of digital curation as a lifecycle management strategy to manage, evaluate, collect, organize, preserve, share, and support the use and re-use of digital assets. The course introduces digital curation models, infrastructures, standards, initiatives, and technical tools; and covers the concepts and skills involved in creating and managing an integrated and sustainable digital cultural heritage repository as a trusted body of digital information for current and future use.

Required Textbook:

Ross Harvey. 2010. Digital Curation: A How-to-do-it Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://lis.cua.edu/res/docs/syllabi/2012spring/LSC617ZhangSpring2012.pdf

Digital Curation: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Mél Hogan

School:

University of Colorado Boulder

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

This course focuses on the creation of a multimodal personal research archive and the theories of digital curation writ large that inform its production.

As researchers, our interest in the archive as a site of theoretical and pragmatic inquiry has been transformed by emergent media, and specifically, the new affordances of digitization in terms of access, storage, circulation and searchability. As such, both the ways in which we generate for the archive, and our reliance on what we can extract from it, have become increasingly important conceptual and methodological issues. Arguably, ontologies of the archive — which remain largely based on authenticity, rivalry, and the originality of artefacts and official records — are always challenged by new and emergent media.

See syllabus for a longer description.

Required Textbook:

No textbook required.

Link to Syllabus:

http://melhogan.com/website/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Digital-Curation-Syllabus2.pdf

Digital Preservation: Spring 2013

Instructor:

Mark A. Matienzo

School:

iSchool at Drexel

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

This course will explore concepts, principles, and practice for the preservation of digital information resources. Digital preservation is a fundamental issue for anyone responsible for the creation or management of digital information. The class will address conceptual models, policy frameworks, technical approaches and requirements, and a number of case studies of real-world digital preservation projects and systems.

The class will consist of weekly lectures, supplemented by readings, discussion, and assignments. Each week will focus on specific primary topics, but students should seek connections between the topics and the application of principles across domains and different types of digital preservation problems. Furthermore, each week’s concepts will build on concepts and material introduced and discussed in previous weeks. In discussion, students are encouraged to bring up past experience when relevant to the current week’s topic.

Required Textbook:

Harvey, Ross. Digital Curation: A How-To-Do It Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://matienzo.org/teaching/drexel-info756/2013-spring/