Doctoral Seminar: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

This integrative course is the first of a two-semester sequence of INST 888. Serving as your introduction to the field of Information Studies (aka, Library and Information Studies,
Information Science, the iField, and several other things, depending on who you ask) and research about information, both semesters of the course will present an overview of intellectual
foundations, key areas of research, methods, and theories used in the study of information. While it is impossible to capture the breadth of an entire academic field in the course of two semesters, this course will provide you with a foundation by which you can begin to understand the breadth and depth of this interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary field.

Building on the first semester focus on foundations, users, technologies, and systems related to information and information research, this second semester of INST 888 will focus on two key perspectives by which to examine and conduct research about information. First, it will discuss the different types of contexts that information research can be used to study, from access to ethics and values and from education to public policy. Second, the spring semester will focus research about the institutions that are central to providing information access in society, ranging from the venerable public library to the omnipresent Internet. Most weeks address interrelated comments and institutions, and each week’s readings will introduce research, methods, and theories relevant to the topic. By the end of this semester, students will have a sense of the scope of the field to ensure that they have a solid foundation on which to build their own research as they progress through the doctoral program.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/inst888spring2015.pdf

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Information Literacy, Inclusion, and the Public Good: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

A large portion of the activities of information professionals have become educational in the digital age. Information literacy and inclusion are the crux of the public good that all information organizations provide to their users. Librarians, often utilizing public access technology, assist users with locating and understanding information; archivists need to guide users through materials; and information managers need to train employees to effectively use new systems. This course will focus on the educational and psychological dimensions of helping and supporting new users to become information literate and experienced users to remain included.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/inst614spring2015.pdf

Information and Human Rights: Fall 2013

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

The concept of human rights is the belief that all individuals deserve certain equal rights as members of society. This course examines information as a human right, including topics on the relationship of information to human rights; social, cultural, economic, legal, and political forces shaping information rights; the impacts of information rights on information professions, standards, and cultural institutions; and disadvantaged populations. While this course will focus on the United States, cases and examples will be drawn from international events.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INST613fall2013final2.pdf

E-Government: Spring 2009

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

This course will examine the nature, current impacts, and potential future impacts of e-government, also known as digital government or electronic government. E-government is the use of the Internet and other information and communication technologies to provide government information and services, as well as channels of communication to citizens, businesses, and other governments. The United States and many other governments around the world at local, state, federal, and supra-national levels have developed an online presence, ranging from simple information to complex services. These are collectively known as e-government. E-government, as a trend only ten years old, is still at the stage where its actual long-term role has yet to be determined. This course will examine what it is currently doing and what it can do both in the US and internationally. Specific areas of study will include the e-government’s relation to the political process and to information policy, what populations are and are not using e-government, challenges to access, the evaluation of e-government, public sphere entities that support e-government, and social networking applications and e-government, among other topics.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20708E%20Jaeger%20Spring%202009.pdf

Information Literacy, Inclusion, and the Public Good: Spring 2013

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

A large portion of the activities of information professionals have become educational in the digital age. Information literacy and inclusion are the crux of the public good that all information organizations provide to their users. Librarians, often utilizing public access technology, assist users with locating and understanding information; archivists need to guide users through materials; and information managers need to train employees to effectively use new systems. This course will focus on the educational and psychological dimensions of helping and supporting new users to become information literate and experienced users to remain included.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INST614-spring2013-Jaeger.doc

Information and Human Rights: Spring 2013

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

The concept of human rights is the belief that all individuals deserve certain equal rights as members of society. This course examines information as a human right, including topics on the relationship of information to human rights; social, cultural, economic, legal, and political forces shaping information rights; the impacts of information rights on information professions, standards, and cultural institutions; and disadvantaged populations. While this course will focus on the United States, cases and examples will be drawn from international events.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INST613-spring2013-Jaeger.doc