E-Government: Spring 2009

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

This course will examine the nature, current impacts, and potential future impacts of e-government, also known as digital government or electronic government. E-government is the use of the Internet and other information and communication technologies to provide government information and services, as well as channels of communication to citizens, businesses, and other governments. The United States and many other governments around the world at local, state, federal, and supra-national levels have developed an online presence, ranging from simple information to complex services. These are collectively known as e-government. E-government, as a trend only ten years old, is still at the stage where its actual long-term role has yet to be determined. This course will examine what it is currently doing and what it can do both in the US and internationally. Specific areas of study will include the e-government’s relation to the political process and to information policy, what populations are and are not using e-government, challenges to access, the evaluation of e-government, public sphere entities that support e-government, and social networking applications and e-government, among other topics.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20708E%20Jaeger%20Spring%202009.pdf

Marketing Information Services: Summer 2009

Instructor:

Patricia H. Fisher

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Summer 2009

Description:

This course addresses the marketing process as a core activity for all types of libraries. Students will learn how scanning their library’s environment, assessing community needs, and planning for services that meet customer needs are integrated into the development of marketing-mix strategies and tactics to promote the benefits of library and information services to target markets. Topics such as branding and positioning will be covered, as part of developing promotional and public awareness campaigns. Students will have the opportunity to work in teams to develop a marketing plan for a “real-world” information service at the Prince Georges Community College Learning Resources Center (Library).

Required Textbook:

Fisher, P. H., Pride, M. M. 2006. Blueprint for Your Library Marketing Plan: A Guide to Help You Survive and Thrive.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20708D%20Fisher%20Summer%202009.pdf

Information for Decision-Making: Fall 2009

Instructor:

Vedat G. Diker

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2009

Description:

Many decision problems encountered in professional life can be modeled and solved by using a range of decision-making and problem-solving methods. There are different ways to group decision-making and problem-solving methods: hard vs. soft, single-criterion vs. multi-criteria, individual vs. group, deterministic vs. probabilistic. This course will introduce basic concepts in decision theory, and a variety of methods that can be used in individual and organizational decision-making and problem-solving. The course will also provide a “descriptive” perspective (in addition to the “normative” perspective) for identifying a variety of biases and errors in human decision-making.

Required Textbook:

Winston, W. L. 2004. Microsoft Excel Data Analysis and Business Modeling.

OR

Winston, W. L. 2007. Microsoft Office Excel 2007 Data Analysis and Business Modeling.

AND

Plous, S. 2007. The Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20705%20Diker%20Fall%202009%20online.pdf

Serials: Summer 2009

Instructor:

Steve Black

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Summer 2009

Description:

General bibliographical control of serials, including cataloging and recent efforts at international standardization; serials management; collection development and resource sharing.

Required Textbook:

Black, S. 2006. Serials in Libraries: Issues and Practices.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/content_images/black_syllabus_09.pdf

United States Government Information Sources: Spring 2009

Instructor:

James A. Giliberto

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

An examination of the general and specialized sources that comprise the texts and finding aids of United States government information. Practical assignments will give students direct experience with these sources, and the lectures and readings will provide a framework for understanding the ways in which the federal government generates and disseminates information. In addition to printed materials, as array of online services, including Westlaw and Lexis-Nexis, will be studied.

Required Textbook:

Hernon, P. 2002. United States Government Information: Policies and Sources.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/content_images/IST_650_course_syllabus.doc

Information Sources in the Humanities: Spring 2009

Instructor:

Deborah Lines Andersen

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

Bibliographic structure, information resources and services, classic and contemporary scholarship, research problems and trends in the humanities.

Required Textbook:

Blazek, R., Aversa, E. 2000. The Humanities: A Selective Guide to Information Sources, 5th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/content_images/643Spring09Syllabus.doc