Integrating Technology into Learning and Teaching: Fall 2012

Instructor:

June Ahn

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2012

Description:

Through discussions, research, readings, hands-on activities, and projects, candidates will explore a number of technologies applicable for teaching and learning. Candidates will assess the how, when, and why of infusing technology into the teaching and learning process. Topics include teaching with technology through the exploration of various hardware, software, multi-media, and on-line services developed for schools and libraries. The course will culminate in a presentation of the candidate’s knowledge and skills in facilitating the application of technology in a learning environment.

Required Textbook:

Jenkins, H. 2006. Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. (PDF)

Kamenetz, A. 2010. Learning, Freedom, and the Web. (Free eBook)

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC642-Fall2012-ahn.pdf

Transformational Information Technologies: Spring 2007

Instructor:

Doug Oard

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2007

Description:

The times in which we live are seeing the greatest sustained rate of change in technology in all of human history. We need to learn how to think about this tectonic shift and its effect on individuals and society as a whole. This course will explore the ways in which information technologies evolve, and how technologies interact with social systems, ultimately leading us to frameworks for thinking about the coupled evolution of technology and society. We’ll start by looking at what people know about how to think about innovation. Then we’ll work through a series of case studies, starting with those rooted most deeply in the past — where we can learn a lot about what actually happened — and moving towards those rooted most deeply in our vision of the future — where we can explore the utility of our frameworks for thinking about innovation and social transformation.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.umiacs.umd.edu/~oard/teaching/708t/spring07/

Planning and Developing Digital Library Instruction: Summer 2014

Instructor:

Michael-Brian Ogawa

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Summer 2014

Description:

The course introduces relevant principles and guidelines for instructional design that influence digital instruction in various library settings. Students develop an instructional plan for a specific library context and patron need. They also create a digital learning activity to implement the plan. The activities may focus on a range of user needs including refining information search strategies, promoting literacy, accessing research process, or assisting with on-demand reference services.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/694_Ogawa_Harada%20su14.pdf

Introduction to Multimedia Technology & Resources: Fall 2006

Instructor:

Carol S.Y. Kellett

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Fall 2006

Description:

Introduces the latest and specialized technologies for providing, managing, and designing
information services within a library environment. Provides basic experience in desktop
productivity software and web publishing, bibliographic database software, and qualitative and
quantitative data analysis.

Libraries are in the business of not only providing information resources and services to its users but to give them information literacy skills that extend beyond the walls of the library and university into everyday life. Librarians are the heart and soul of delivering these services to library users and must therefore be thoroughly familiar with the technology that resides “underneath” the delivery of information services.

Librarians catalog and index vast collections of materials, provide tools to find these materials (online catalog, tutorials, guides), and instruct library users on how to find information. Librarians must be able to read and synthesize vast amounts of information sources and materials and present them to library users in a manner that they understand – that the role and function of the library and librarian is to guide the library user in evaluating the creation of knowledge.

This course presents an overview of basic tools and techniques which are necessary in almost all library environments and for most MLISc classes. Topics include a general discussion of both graphical and character-based operating systems, the application of word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software in information environments, internet applications such as email and web browsers, the creation of HTML documents within a unix operating system environment, and ongoing discussions on information technology and its use in libraries.

Required Textbook:

Miller, Steven J. 2011. Metadata for Digital Collections: A How-To-Do-Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/694_kellett.pdf

Technology for Libraries & Information Centers: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Luz. M. Quiroga

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

Survey of theories, concepts, methods and practices relating to the application of information technology (IT) to support the administration and use of information resources. Includes digital, printed and audiovisual materials.

Required Textbook:

Kochtanek, T. R., Matthews, J. R. 2002. Library Information Systems: From Library Automation to Distributed Information Access Solutions.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www2.hawaii.edu/~lquiroga/courses/lis672/lis672syllabus.htm

Library Technology Systems: Winter 2013

Instructor:

Richard Jost

School:

University of Washington

Semester:

Winter 2013

Description:

The focus of the course is on the intersection of technology and management in the library information world. As information professionals, you will be involved in automation projects and managing technological change that best meet patron and organizational needs. You will need to develop numerous skills, both technological and managerial, to successfully meet these challenges. This course will provide a foundation for this skill set to develop and acquaint you with a broad understanding of the issues involved in library technology systems.

Although a major topic of this class is the integrated library systems (a fundamental cornerstone of most library technology), we will also explore new library technologies that have a potential place in the library technology world. This class is geared to the thinking and planning processes for library technology, rather than on the specific programming and development of library systems.

Along with the theoretical knowledge that you will obtain on library technology, you will also have some hands-on experience with a library system set up for class use. This will translate some of the concepts that we discuss in class to a real-world situation, providing you with some practical working systems experience. Whether you will be working in a large public or academic library or small school library system, the concepts that we discuss should prepare you for your new career in whatever type of library setting you choose.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

https://faculty.washington.edu/rmjost/overview.shtml

Computer-Mediated Communications: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Mary E. Brown

School:

Southern Connecticut

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

A reading-intensive course on computer-mediated communication (CMC) and its applications in the dissemination of information and delivery of information services. In the context of existing theoretical frameworks and CMC research findings, the course reviews the advantages and disadvantages of CMC technologies as well as the long-term implications of CMC for the information professions.

Required Textbook:

Thurlow, C., Lengel, L., Tomic, A. 2009. Computer mediated communication: Social interaction and the internet.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ares.southernct.edu//ils/uploads/textWidget/wysiwyg/documents/ILS_538-S70-Syllabus-Spring_2012-Brown_Mary.pdf