Building Digital Libraries: Fall 2016

Instructor:

Hsin-liang (Oliver) Chen

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Fall 2016

Description:

This class will focus on developing digital libraries. During the course, we will consider the various definitions of digital libraries in theory and practice. Topics to be covered include: selection criteria, copyright, digitization, metadata, navigation, and project management. The main project will be the creation of a small digital library. Students will create fully function digital libraries. They will also appraise, select, digitize, describe, and make available digital materials. Experience with scanning equipment, imaging software, and HTML editors is helpful.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/654-Building-Digital-Libraries-Chen-Fall2016.pdf

Digital Libraries: Summer 2012

Instructor:

Catherine Stollar Peters

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Summer 2012

Description:

This course will focus on methodology and techniques of creating and using digital libraries. Topics covered in the course include collection development and selection, digitization, metadata, organization, access and use of digital libraries, preservation, and project management. Students will research current issues relating to digital libraries, evaluate existing digital libraries, learn hands-on methods of developing a digital library, and work in teams to produce a small digital library. Upon completion of this course, students will have a foundation for future research in digital libraries and should be able to participate in the planning and management of digital libraries.

Required Textbook:

No textbook required.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/informationstudies/files/IST666_DigitalLibraries2012.pdf

Digital Librarianship: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Peter Jacso

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

To study –from the viewpoint of librarians and information specialists- the evolving field of digital librarianship: the roles of the librarians and other information specialists in the digital age, the types of digital collections, the digital finding tools and resources, as well as the current and future economic, legal and management issues related to digital libraries.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/671_Jacso_f2014.doc

Systems Analysis for Information Management: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Luz. M. Quiroga

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

Overview of systems analysis, its techniques, benefits, and limitations. Focus on libraries and information agencies, although concepts are applicable to other settings. Structured, top-down solutions stressed throughout. Object oriented techniques and data modeling tools are reviewed.

Required Textbook:

Witten, I. H., Bainbridge, D., Nichols, D. M., 2010. How to Build a Digital Library, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/647_Quiroga_f2014.pdf

Digital Libraries: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Edward Bilodeau

School:

McGill

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

Analysis of the complex concepts and applications that professionals are likely to encounter in the design, development, and management of digital libraries. Topics include digital objects, knowledge representations and discovery, architecture, user behaviour, services, and evaluation.

Digital Libraries provides an introduction to the complex concepts and applications that professionals are likely to encounter in the information environment. The course materials and activities are designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the kinds of applications and technologies that are used by professionals to launch digital libraries and manage their operations.

Although the course has a technological focus, it does not include computer programming or other technical aspects (such as HTML), and it builds upon the concepts introduced in the core MLIS courses, providing comprehensive and detailed coverage of various features of digital libraries.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.mcgill.ca/sis/files/sis/glis650_2014fall_bilodeau.pdf

Digital Memorials and Cultural Archives: Summer 2012

Instructor:

Nancy Florio

School:

Southern Connecticut

Semester:

Summer 2012

Description:

Introduction to the theoretical and practical issues confronting digital public historians, digital archivists, and digital curators of memorials and memory sites. This course is a combination of theoretical and hands-on approaches to the creation of cultural digital archives of memorial sites using OMEKA open source software. Using a combination lab and discussion format, students will gain direct experience creating digital archives. Working with the VOICES of September 11th 9/11 Living Memorial Project primary source material contributed by family members, students will help add to the digital collection
that will memorialize the victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Information on 9/11 Memorials, corporations, community response to the attacks, and stories of the survivors and rescue workers will be added to the archive. In the process of adding this material to the 9/11 Living Memorial Project, students will apply theoretical knowledge gained through readings and discussions.

Required Textbook:

Cohen, D. J., Rosenzweig, R. 2006. Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web. (online)
Hughes, L. M. 2004. Digitizing collection: strategic issues for the information manager.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.southernct.edu/ils/uploads/textWidget/wysiwyg/documents/ILS652Syllabus-Summer_2012-Florio-Nancy.pdf

Digital Media Collections: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Melanie Feinberg

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Conceptually, this iteration of 385U is an inquiry into the unknown. Together, as a community of scholar-designers, we will investigate how the notion of residuality, or the experience of being insufficiently described via a classification system, can be actively enacted as part of an information collection’s descriptive infrastructure (metadata). Our exploration focuses on three questions:

  • How can a digital collection foreground the experience of the residual?
  • What constitutes the authoring experience of such a digital collection?
  • What constitutes the reading experience of such a digital collection?

Structurally, this course combines seminar-style, focused discussions of readings with project-based elements of a design studio. We will use activities of critically interrogating experimental designs, making our own designs, and reflecting back on our process and product to generate insight into our foundational questions. Our design practice will be grounded in the idea that a collection is both a form of expression and a form of experience, shaped by the designer, or author, but brought into being by user (or audience, or reader) interactions with the collection’s resources.

Practically, the ideas we engage and the skills we will learn should be applicable to any sort of collection. However, our design environment for this course will focus on digital media collections (specifically videos) made available online as a type of digital library.

Required Textbook:

Anzaldúa, G. 2012. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza, 4th ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/feinberg/2014/spring/INF385U/index.html