Technical Services Operations and Systems: Fall 2016

Instructor:

John Lindaman

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Fall 2016

Description:

The purpose of this course is to provide practical experience in Technical Services operations in libraries and information centers. The course will take place in the Thomas J. Watson Library at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, to provide hands-on work in as many facets of Technical Services as possible, and to see the specifics of how they are implemented in a large research
library.

Among the topics students will examine are: copy cataloging (both in Sierra and Connexion), library acquisitions, collection development, serials control, record loading, data manipulation, materials processing, knowledge organization, and integrated library systems. There will be some reading, but the focus will be on practice.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/LIS775-Technical-Services-Operations-and-Systems-Lindaman-Fall-2016.pdf

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Rare Book Cataloging and Descriptive Bibliography: Spring 2016

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2016

Description:

The purpose of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of descriptive bibliography and to teach them to prepare detailed descriptions of printed books using these methods as well as library cataloging rules established by Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) (DCRM(B)). Lectures, videos, and rare books in the Grolier Club’s collection will be used to illustrate the physical characteristics of printed books (e.g., paper, typography, illustration processes, and binding); presswork and other production processes (e.g., composition, typesetting, and imposition); and the life of the book after its production, especially provenance evidence from inscriptions, bookplates, and other unique marks. Emphasis will be placed on developing a technical vocabulary to describe the physical aspects of printed books.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create detailed catalog descriptions of printed books and other special collections material according to descriptive bibliographical principles and DCRM(B) standards. Students will also gain a good grounding in the theory and methods of descriptive bibliography, learn how it informs and differs from rare book cataloging, and evaluate current cataloging practices and online retrieval systems on the basis of their treatment of printed books and other special collections material.

Required Textbook:

Carter, John. 2006. ABC for Book Collectors, 8th ed. Download.
Library of Congress. 2011. Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books). Download.
Gaskell, Philip. 1995. A New Introduction to Bibliography.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/709-Rare-Book-Cataloging-and-Desc.-Bib.-Pena-Spring-2016.pdf

Introduction to Knowledge Organization: Spring 2017

Instructor:

J. Fernando Peña

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2017

Description:

This course serves as an introduction to the principles of knowledge organization in a library and information center setting. It emphasizes understanding the function of catalogs of all kinds, indexes, bibliographies and Web browsers, and acquiring the ability to use and interpret these tools effectively. Students will be introduced to bibliographic utilities, online catalogs and indexes, the World Wide Web as a knowledge organization tool, the principles of metadata, and various current standards for organizing knowledge and information, including Dublin Core, MARC formats, Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2), Resource Description and Access (RDA), Library of Congress Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, Dewey Decimal Classification, and Library of Congress Classification.

Required Textbook:

Miller, Steven J. 2011. Metadata for Digital Collections: A How-To-Do-Manual.

Taylor, Arlene G., and Daniel N. Joudrey. 2009. The Organization of Information. 3rd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/512-Intro.-to-Knowledge-Organization-Pena-Spring-2017.pdf

Information Processing: Spring 2012

Instructor:

Hemalata Iyer

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Spring 2012

Description:

An introduction to the principles and practices of bibliographic control, including cataloging and classification. A variety of methods, systems, and tools are used to illustrate the application of underlying principles in practical situations.

Required Textbook:

Chan, L. M. 2007. Cataloging and Classification: An Introduction, 3rd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/cci/images/603_Wed__SP12_Iyer.pdf

Information and Knowledge Organization: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Donghee Sinn

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

An introduction to fundamental concepts and theoretical principles of knowledge-organization models and techniques used to facilitate access to information resources. The emphasis in this course is on interdisciplinary ideas and concepts.

Required Textbook:

Taylor, A. G. and Joudrey, D. N. 2009. The Organization of Information, 3rd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/informationstudies/files/602_Sinn_Fa14.pdf

Advanced Cataloging: Fall 2013

Instructor:

Michael A. Chopey

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

Building on cataloging principles and rules taught in LIS 605, LIS 606 introduces students to the rules, principles, and practices of authority control in library catalogs, reference structure, choice of access points in the bibliographic record, form of access points, MARC authority record construction, cataloging of various non-book formats including electronic formats, and cataloging of continuing resources. Continues (from 605) the study of Functional Requirements of Bibliographic Records (FRBR), descriptive cataloging using RDA (Resource Description & Access), MARC bibliographic format, Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), and Library of Congress Classification (LCC).

Required Textbook:

Furrie, B. 2003. Understanding MARC bibliographic: machine-readable cataloging, 7th ed. Available online.
Library of Congress. 2003. Network Development and MARC Standards Office. Understanding MARC authority records: machine-readable cataloging. Available online.
OCLC bibliographic formats and standards. Available online.
MARC bibliographic format. Available online.
OCLC authorities userguide. Available online.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www2.hawaii.edu/~chopey/606sylla.htm

Basic Cataloging and Classification: Summer 2009

Instructor:

Ruth Horie

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Summer 2009

Description:

Introductory cataloging and classification covering Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, Revised (AACR2), Library of Congress and Dewey Decimal classification systems, LC Subject Headings, Machine Readable Cataloging (MARC), and use of OCLC.

Required Textbook:

American Library Association. Anglo-American Cataloging Rules.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/605_horie_SS09.pdf