E-Government: Spring 2009

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

This course will examine the nature, current impacts, and potential future impacts of e-government, also known as digital government or electronic government. E-government is the use of the Internet and other information and communication technologies to provide government information and services, as well as channels of communication to citizens, businesses, and other governments. The United States and many other governments around the world at local, state, federal, and supra-national levels have developed an online presence, ranging from simple information to complex services. These are collectively known as e-government. E-government, as a trend only ten years old, is still at the stage where its actual long-term role has yet to be determined. This course will examine what it is currently doing and what it can do both in the US and internationally. Specific areas of study will include the e-government’s relation to the political process and to information policy, what populations are and are not using e-government, challenges to access, the evaluation of e-government, public sphere entities that support e-government, and social networking applications and e-government, among other topics.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/LBSC%20708E%20Jaeger%20Spring%202009.pdf

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United States Government Information Sources: Spring 2009

Instructor:

James A. Giliberto

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Spring 2009

Description:

An examination of the general and specialized sources that comprise the texts and finding aids of United States government information. Practical assignments will give students direct experience with these sources, and the lectures and readings will provide a framework for understanding the ways in which the federal government generates and disseminates information. In addition to printed materials, as array of online services, including Westlaw and Lexis-Nexis, will be studied.

Required Textbook:

Hernon, P. 2002. United States Government Information: Policies and Sources.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/content_images/IST_650_course_syllabus.doc

Government Documents: Fall 2012

Instructor:

Gwen Sinclair

School:

University of Hawaii

Semester:

Fall 2012

Description:

This advanced reference course provides a foundation for understanding the content, structure, bibliographic control, and dissemination of government information at the state, local, national, and international levels. Assignments provide practical experience to allow students to integrate government information sources into their repertoires.

Required Textbook:

Forte, E. J., Hartnett, C. J., Sevetson, A. L. 2011. Fundamentals of Government Information: Mining, Finding, Evaluating, and Using Government Resources.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/content/syllabi/618_sinclair_f12.pdf

Government Information: Fall 2014

Instructor:

David Jank

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

This course will provide students with an overview of government information services, sources, and issues, at all levels. Students will be introduced to publications, databases, Web sites, periodicals, multi-media services, and Internet portals available for obtaining information from a variety of government departments. United States and State of New York Government Agencies, Regional government offices, the Federal Depository Library Program, and the network of Presidential Libraries, will all be studied. International issues relating to government information, as well as trends in access, economics, and social concerns surrounding government information and governmental regulation of information access and use, will also be examined.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/LIS_669_Government_Info_Syllabus_SPRING_2014.pdf

Government Information Resources

Instructor:

School:

Rutgers

Semester:

Description:

An introduction to the nature and use of federal, local and international governments’ information resources; problems relating to the acquisition, bibliographic organization and reference use of public documents. Major emphasis on information resources of the U.S. Federal Government.

Required Textbook:

Hernon, Peter et al. 2002. United States Government Information: Policies and Sources.
Sources.

Link to Syllabus:

http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/images/syllabus_541.pdf

E-government: Spring 2014

Instructor:

John Carlo Berot

School:

iSchool at Marland

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The social, policy, and information science and technology factors driving the current evaluation of e-government in the United States, its various forms of implementation (from simple online presence through intermediate levels of basic capability, service availability and mature delivery, to service transformation), the identification of best practices and lessons learned from the national and international community, and emerging issues (e.g., privacy, security, and digital
divide).

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/egovspring2014_19january2014.pdf