Web Tools and Development: Spring 2013

Instructor:

Morgan Doocy

School:

University of Washington

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with server-side web programming languages and technologies, complex website architecture and infrastructure, and the construction of data-driven web sites and services.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.washington.edu/info344/#!/syllabus/

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Client-Side Web Development: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Jacob A. Morris

School:

University of Washington

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

This course provides an introduction to client side web development including markup, programming languages, protocols, libraries, frameworks, and techniques for creating effective, usable, dynamic, and responsive sites/applications that meet user needs. We will also discuss web development roles within an organization, content management systems, and other popular tools to build and manage web sites and applications.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.washington.edu/info343/

Client-side Web Development: Summer 2014

Instructor:

Jon Swanson

School:

University of Washington

Semester:

Summer 2014

Description:

This course provides an introduction to client side web development . The core things you will be introduced to are:

  • HTML, the hypertext markup language.
  • CSS, the stylesheet language that defines the look and feel of a website
  • JavaScript, the web’s scripting language (and some useful libraries and frameworks that extend its usefulness)
  • Web protocols that define how information is transferred over the web
  • Version control and file management on a server

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://faculty.washington.edu/jswan2/info343/

Web System Design & Management: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Charles-Antoine Julien

School:

McGill

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

This course has been developed with the information professional in mind. It seeks to provide students with the skills and understanding that they are most likely to require in their information careers: the strategy, design, and management of a web site,

Required Textbook:

Castro, E. 2007. HTML, XHTML & CSS, 6th ed.
Duckett, J. 2011. HTML & CSS: Design and Build Websites.
Krug, S. 200). Don’t Make Me Think, 2nd ed.
Lynch, P. J., Horton, S. 2008. Web Style Guide, 3rd ed.
Morville, P., Rosenfeld, L. 2007. Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, 3rd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.mcgill.ca/sis/files/sis/glis634_2014fall_julien.pdf

Information Architecture: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Andromeda Yelton

School:

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

Howdy and welcome! While this course is formally “Information Architecture”, I think of it as “Help! My organization has a web site (and I might end up in charge of it)”.

In one semester, I can’t hope to make you experts in all the things you might need to know to build and manage a web site — especially since it’s always changing! However, you will know what domains you’ll need to learn more about if you find yourself running a real-world web site; the vocabulary for talking with domain experts; and where to go to learn more.

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

https://thatandromeda.github.io/courseware/LIS_861_Spring_2014/
Fork it on Github

Emerging Web Technologies: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Qiping Zhang

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

With the advent of new web technologies, an explosion of new social software tools has emerged enabling users to create, organize, share, and collaborate in an online space. Today’s Web users are organizing their favorite bookmarks, collaborating on shared documents, cataloging their personal collections, and sharing their information with others. This course will explore the features and functionality of emerging web technologies such as blogs, wikis, RSS, social bookmarking, media sharing, tagging, folksonomies and more. This course will look at how libraries are implementing these various tools as well as their potential uses.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/517-Emerging-Technologies-spring-2014-Zhang.pdf

Social Computing Technologies And Applications: Fall 2013

Instructor:

Brian Butler

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2013

Description:

Online communities, online discussions, Twitter, Tmblr, Social Networking Systems, social media, crowdsourcing, human computation, Facebook, blogs, Pinterest, wikis, social recommendations, collective intelligence…. these are just a few of the many terms and technologies which making up the rapidly evolving domain of social computing. Successfully deploying social computing technologies requires a blend of technical and organizational knowledge and skills. Knowledge of both the core technologies and central social dynamics is essential if you are to develop effective social computing applications.

The goal of this course is to develop your ability to recognize and capitalize on opportunities to use social computing technologies to advance the goals of individuals, organizations, and communities.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/INFM741-Syllabus-F13%20v2.docx