Field Studies in Archives, Records and Information Management: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Michael J. Kurtz

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

This course provides students with an opportunity, through a supervised project, to understand the application of archival principles and techniques, first-hand in an institutional program setting. The focus is on a well-defined field project that constitutes a learning experience and also permits the student to contribute to the ongoing work of the host institution. Each student will select a project site and work with the site mentor and the instructor [as needed] to define the nature and scope of the specific project. The project should be designed to take approximately 120 hours, which may be completed in any time combination through the semester. The project must address one or more aspects of archival work-records management, appraisal, accessioning, arrangement, description, preservation, or reference. A project that addresses several aspects, such as accessioning a small collection and processing it to the point it is available to researchers is acceptable, but not the only option. Students may have the opportunity to explore, within the site setting, ways in which the institution is using technology to carry out its mission. All site projects must be approved by both the site mentor and the instructor.

Required Textbook:

Bastian, J. A., Weber, D. 2008. Archival Internships: A Guide for Faculty, Supervisors, and Students.

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lbsc_703_field_study_syllabus-fall_2014.docx

Fundamentals of Records Management: Fall 2014

Instructor:

Andrew Raymond

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Fall 2014

Description:

Basic concepts and practices of records management in governmental, institutional, and corporate agencies, including those areas of communication, administration and computer technology that relate to the efficient and effective flow of information from its generation to its final disposition. Will include records inventory, active and inactive records control, manual and automated systems, vital records protection, the records center, micrographics technology and applications, and legal and ethical aspects of records management.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/informationstudies/files/546_Raymond_Sp14.pdf

Electronic Records Management: Spring 2013

Instructor:

Catherine Stollar Peters

School:

University at Albany

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

Topics include problems of defining records and documents in a digital environment, analysis and understanding of the requirements for creating and keeping records digitally, developing information systems that create usable and accessible digital records, and preservation of and access to digital materials. The emphasis is on electronic records created by institutions and organizations.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://www.albany.edu/informationstudies/files/IST547_Peters.pdf

Digital Archiving and Preservation: Spring 2014

Instructor:

Patricia Galloway

School:

University of Texas at Austin

Semester:

Spring 2014

Description:

The course will focus upon what happens to electronic records from all sources, including preservation reformatting and digital library creation, once they have crossed the “archival threshold” (whether actually or figuratively) for permanent retention. The course will cover media refreshment, conversion to neutral formats vs. emulation to retain original format, migration, migration on demand; significant properties of digital objects, what they are and their importance for preservation; format and metadata repositories and the use of metadata in digital archives; digital signatures, message digests, authenticity, and reauthentication in the long-term preservation of electronic records; and electronic records archival repository construction, use, and administration. Projects based on the iSchool institutional repository and the UTDR will be undertaken by students as case studies. Students will also be introduced to how existing standard practices in the information technology field are being adapted to archival requirements: code versioning, vaulting, and escrow, data warehousing, text and data mining, web crawling, knowledge management, IT auditing. Issues of access, including privacy and open records in the context of World Wide Web standards and digital library initiatives, will also be addressed.

Required Textbook:

Jones, R., Andrew, T., MacColl, J. 2006. The Institutional Repository.
Farmer, D., Venema, W. 2005. Forensic Discovery. (online)
Harvey, R. 2010. Digital Curation: A How-to-do-it Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://courses.ischool.utexas.edu/galloway/2014/spring/INF392K/index.html

Records Management: Spring 2013

Instructor:

William Saffady

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2013

Description:

This course provides a survey of fundamental records management concepts and methods as they apply to the operating records maintained by businesses, government agencies, and other organizations. At the end of the course, you should understand:

  • The purpose of records management and its distinctive role in an organization’s information management activities.
  • The scope and content of a systematic records management program and the types of information management problems that records management can effectively address.
  • The relationship of records management to other information management activities and business operations, including computer systems analysis, librarianship, and archives.
  • The work steps required to prepare and implement retention schedules for operating records in a business, government agency, or other organization.
  • The characteristics of micrographics systems and their role in records management programs.
  • Methods of identifying and protecting an organization’s vital office records.
  • Basic filing system concepts and methods for office records.

Required Textbook:

Saffady, W. 2011. Records and Information Management: Fundamentals of Professional Practice, 2nd ed.

Link to Syllabus:

Archives and Records Management

Instructor:

Emil Hoelter

School:

University of Tennessee – Knoxville

Semester:

Description:

IS 564 is a survey course, covering the history, theory, methodology, and practice of archival studies, including: fundamentals of acquisition and appraisal; evaluation and value; arrangement and description, preservation, reference and access, outreach and advocacy, and standards, tools and technologies. The course is designed to be reflective of the current state of archives, exploring such issues as the differences between the “archives” of a blog and a traditional archival repository (if there is such a difference), the archives’ role in the lives of people who may never enter an archives reading room, and the role of cultural institutions in the keeping of memory and in social justice. We will look at the relationships between the archives and records management fields, and discuss how archival and records management practice fit into the larger world of information management. No previous archival or history education or experience is necessary. This course is designed for students with an interest in archival professions, as well as students interested in simply learning more about archival concepts, principles, theory and practice as these intersect with several other subdomains within the information science landscape.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

https://www.sis.utk.edu/sites/default/files/syllabus/INSC564syl.pdf

Management of Current Records: 2011

Instructor:

Victoria Lemieux

School:

University of British Columbia

Semester:

2011

Description:

Through this course, students will obtain a solid grounding in the fundamental concepts,principles and methods of managing current records. Students will learn how to undertake business systems and functional analysis; develop records classification systems and retention schedules;conduct risk assessments; and write RIM policies – all critical skills in managing current records. The course also will introduce students to more advanced topics in managing current records in preparation for further studies or future work experience related to the management of current records.

Required Textbook:

See syllabus.

Link to Syllabus:

Cached version