Audio Preservation: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Marcos Sueiro Bal

School:

Long Island University

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

In this class we explore the issues related to the preservation of audio materials, both in legacy formats and in current or future or digital forms.

Required Textbook:

Bradley, K. 2009. Guidelines on the Production and Preservation of Digital Audio. Download.
Objects

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/716-Audio-Preservation-Sueiro-Bal-Spring-20152.pdf

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Institute on Map Collections: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Matthew A. Knutzen

School:

Palmer School

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

Maps are most efficient deliverers of information, dealing with the spatial dimension of events in time. Ecology, history, property, archaeology, events in the news all can be clarified by the cartographer’s artistic and/or scientific hand, on paper or on the web. This institute is an introduction to maps as information tools. We will examine maps, atlases and globes, and their collection in local and national libraries; and by private collectors and their impact on library map collections. Participants will draw upon this information and experience to investigate and evaluate specific research areas and topics.

Required Textbook:

Miller, Steven J. 2011. Metadata for Digital Collections: A How-To-Do-Manual.

Link to Syllabus:

http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/901-Maps-Institute-Knutzen-Spring-2015.pdf

Public Library Seminar: Spring 2015

Instructor:

John Carlo Bertot

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

This course is intended for students interested in pursuing a career in public library service or who have an interest in the role and contribution of the public library to society. The course focuses on the history of the public library in the United States, the social contributions of public libraries, public library services and roles, the building of the public library profession/professionals, the ethics and values of public libraries, the policy and political context in which public libraries reside, and the ways in which public libraries transform communities.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/plseminarspring2015syllabus24january2015_0_0.pdf

Creating Information Infrastructures: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Katy Lawley

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

Creating Information Infrastructures introduces students to the foundations of acquiring and managing collections, information structures, indexing and discovery systems in Library and Information Studies. The course introduces theoretical concepts, trends, systems, and technologies central to this area of the field and equips students with the skills and conceptual
background to create and manage information systems and services. The course is centered on the exploration of library and archival information systems, with students working to create,
index, and produce their own objects and descriptive metadata for physical and digital contexts. In order to introduce students to the broad world of information institutions, how they
manage resources and provide access for their users the course is broken into four thematic areas:

  • Terms of reference: What are information institutions, and in what social context do they exist?
  • Get it: What kinds of resources do information institutions manage, and how do they come to have them?
  • Find it: How do institutions manage these resources, what conceptual and functional skills are required for this work, and what benefits and limitations exist for each approach (e.g., automated vs. manual)?
  • Serve it: How do information institutions provide access to these resources in physical and Web-based settings?

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lawleylbsc671syllabus.spring2015.pdf

School Librarians as Information Professionals: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Sheri Anita Massey

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

Over the past 100 years, education in the United States has grown in size and–even more–in complexity. Part of this development has involved the developing recognition of the importance of the school library program as an integral part of the educational system. In order to function effectively within that system, school librarians must understand a number of elements that affect their position in the school: the historical, organizational, and contemporary contexts of school library programs; the principles of teaching, learning, and information literacy that underlie the school library program; and the leadership role that school librarians can play within the school community. This course introduces candidates to all these elements, concentrating on the various roles of the school librarians in supporting student learning.

The roles are derived from the mission statement first adopted in 1988, by the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) and the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) to guide the development and improvement of school library programs nationwide. This mission statement was reaffirmed in 1998, and expanded in the revised guidelines for the field, Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs, published by the American Library Association in 2009. As stated below, the mission statement underlies the College’s School Library Specialization and LBSC 640, which is designed to introduce candidates to the specialization and to the information professions in general:

The mission of the school library program is to ensure that students and staff are effective users of ideas and information. The school librarian empowers students to be critical thinkers, enthusiastic readers, skillful researchers, and ethical users of information by:

  • collaborating with educators and students to design and teach engaging learning experiences that meet individual needs.
  • instructing students and assisting educators in using, evaluating, and producing information and ideas through active use of a broad range of appropriate tools, resources, and information technologies.
  • providing access to materials in all formats, including up-to-date, high-quality, varied literature to develop and strengthen a love of reading.
  • providing students and staff with instruction and resources that reflect current information needs and anticipate changes in technology and education.
  • providing leadership in the total education program and advocating for strong school library programs as essential to meeting local, state, and national education goals.

The course also will introduce candidates to the Standards for the 21st Century Learner, launched by AASL in October 2007. This document outlines the skills that candidates need for understanding, thinking and mastering subjects; the dispositions that guide their thinking and intellectual behaviors; the responsibilities that reflect behaviors used by independent learners in researching, investigating and problem solving; and the self-assessment strategies that enable candidates to reflect on their own learning

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/lbsc_640_-_intro_to_slmps_-_syllabus_-_spring_2015_web.pdf

Doctoral Seminar: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Paul T. Jaeger

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

This integrative course is the first of a two-semester sequence of INST 888. Serving as your introduction to the field of Information Studies (aka, Library and Information Studies,
Information Science, the iField, and several other things, depending on who you ask) and research about information, both semesters of the course will present an overview of intellectual
foundations, key areas of research, methods, and theories used in the study of information. While it is impossible to capture the breadth of an entire academic field in the course of two semesters, this course will provide you with a foundation by which you can begin to understand the breadth and depth of this interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary field.

Building on the first semester focus on foundations, users, technologies, and systems related to information and information research, this second semester of INST 888 will focus on two key perspectives by which to examine and conduct research about information. First, it will discuss the different types of contexts that information research can be used to study, from access to ethics and values and from education to public policy. Second, the spring semester will focus research about the institutions that are central to providing information access in society, ranging from the venerable public library to the omnipresent Internet. Most weeks address interrelated comments and institutions, and each week’s readings will introduce research, methods, and theories relevant to the topic. By the end of this semester, students will have a sense of the scope of the field to ensure that they have a solid foundation on which to build their own research as they progress through the doctoral program.

Required Textbook:

No required textbook.

Link to Syllabus:

http://ischool.umd.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/inst888spring2015.pdf

Big Data Infrastructure: Spring 2015

Instructor:

Jimmy Lin

School:

iSchool at Maryland

Semester:

Spring 2015

Description:

Over the past few years, we have seen the emergence of “big data”: disruptive technologies that have transformed commerce, science, and many aspects of society. These developments are enabled by infrastructure that allows us to distribute computations across hundreds or even thousands of commodity servers. One key breakthrough that makes this all possible is the development of abstractions for data-intensive computing that allow programmers to reason about computations at a massive scale, hiding low-level details such as synchronization, data movement, and fault tolerance.

This course provides an introduction to big data infrastructure, starting with MapReduce, the first of these datacenter-scale programming abstractions. The Hadoop implementation of MapReduce lies at the core of an application stack that is gaining widespread adoption in both industry and academia. A major focus of this course is algorithm design and “thinking at scale”, applied to a variety of domains: text, graphs, relational data, etc. We will also cover a number of next generation systems that are vying to replace MapReduce as the de facto big data processing platform of tomorrow.

Required Textbook:

Lin, J., Dyer, C. 2010. Data-Intensive Text Processing with MapReduce.
White, T. 2015. Hadoop: The Definitive Guide.

Link to Syllabus:

https://github.com/lintool/UMD-courses/tree/master/bigdata-2015-Spring